Symposium

The goal of the Symposium is to provide women in clean energy with a range of perspectives on clean energy challenges and opportunities. It also provides a forum for networking. It is our hope that the symposium helps to build a sustained national and international community of professionals dedicated to advancing the careers and goals of women in clean energy.

The 2014 Women in Clean Energy Symposium occurred on September 16-17. This year the theme was Urban Strategies for a New Energy Future.

 

Special thanks to our Sponsors

Lockheed Martin
Chevron
National Grid
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center
SolarCity
Cummins Inc.
GE ecomagination
Walmart

Tuesday, September 16

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Welcome

  1. C3E Ambassador Martha Broad

    Executive Director, MIT Energy Initiative
    broad-marthaMs. Martha Broad is the Executive Director of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), which addresses global energy challenges through member-sponsored research, education, and outreach programs. As part of the MITEI leadership team, she is helping to link science, innovation, and policy to transform the world’s energy systems.

    With more than 20 years of experience in organizational management in the energy and sustainability fields, Broad has worked extensively with business, government, and nonprofit stakeholders to forge successful public-private partnerships. She works closely with MIT member companies who together have pledged over $30 million annually for MIT research on a spectrum of topics, including energy storage, energy efficiency, and renewable energy technologies.

    Prior to MITEI, Broad was the Director of Knowledge Development at the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, the first state agency to focus primarily on clean energy economic development. During her nine-year tenure, she managed a number of award-winning programs related to green electricity, wind development, and the commercialization of clean energy technologies.

    Broad began her career as a Capitol Hill lobbyist for the Natural Resources Defense Council, earned an MBA from the Yale School of Management, and subsequently launched and managed two successful green companies: a unique for-profit green auto insurance agency owned by the Conservation Law Foundation, and the Rainforest Crunch (candy) Company, a Ben and Jerry’s spin-off that sourced sustainably harvested Amazon rainforest ingredients and donated profits to rainforest preservation.

  2. Ahsha Tribble

    Senior Advisor to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy
    As a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ahsha Tribble works across the Department to define and integrate capabilities to carry out DOE’s responsibilities for emergency response, incident management, and Department and industry preparedness and short-term resilience actions – all in service of the Department’s efforts to enhance the security, reliability, and resilience of the nation’s energy infrastructure. Her role is a key part of the Secretary’s emphasis on strengthening management and performance across DOE. Prior to DOE, Dr. Tribble served over three years on the White House National Security Council. During that time, she served as the interim Deputy Homeland Security Advisor, Senior Director for Response, and Director of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience. She led or supported the White House response coordination for major disasters including Hurricanes Sandy and Irene; the Japanese earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster; major flooding on the Mississippi River and in Colorado; numerous tornado outbreaks; and the West, Texas chemical plant explosion. Prior to joining NSC, Dr. Tribble spent ten years in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Dr. Tribble received her B.S. in Mathematics/Actuarial Science (with a Minor in Business Administration) from Florida A&M University, M.S. in Meteorology from Florida State University, and Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.

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Issues Framing

  1. Amy Glasmeier

    Professor of Economic Geography and Regional Planning, MIT
    (Slides)
    glasmeier-amy2 Dr. Amy Glasmeier holds a professional masters and PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley. From 2009 to 2013, she was the Department Head of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. She serves as a professor of economic geography and regional planning and is Co-Chair of the Energy Education Task Force of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI).

    She received a Distinguished Scholarship Honors from the Association of American Geographers (AAG) at the Association’s annual meeting in 2014 for her data-rich insights into the geographies of economic development and planning, her research on patterns and trends in rural poverty in America, and her outstanding efforts to understand and inform public policy.

    Glasmeier is the author and co-author of several monographs – including Manufacturing Time: Global Competition in the World Watch Industry 1750-2000; High-tech Potential: Economic Development in Rural America; From Combines to Computers: Rural Services and Development in the Age of Information Technology; and High Tech America – as well as the Atlas of Poverty in America. These books reflect the topics of her articles, book chapters and policy reports where she has provided important insights into the development of industrial complexes and high-tech industries, geographies of trade policy and globalization, the failures and successes of efforts to end poverty, and the landscape of inequality in the United States.

    Her work assesses public policy through careful empirical analysis of economic and census data. One key contribution is Glasmeier’s focus on the unintended effects of public policy, especially in rural America, documenting the impacts of NAFTA, high-tech industries and federal economic development programs on the poor and the prosperity of rural communities.

    Glasmeier’s research and policy contributions in the field of energy dateback to 1970s, when she contributed to the first California university system-wide public outreach program around renewable energy. During the 1980s Glasmeier developed expertise in the fields of boomtown impact analysis and energy development in the western United States.

    For almost two decades, Glasmeier provided key technical support for the Appalachian Regional Commission, a federal state agency with geographic responsibility for economic and social development of the nation’s eastern coalfields, among the poorest communities in the US. As part of a team, Glasmeier developed the agency’s first region-wide energy policy, departing significantly from the previous reliance on coal toward a more balanced program emphasizing renewable and non renewable energy sources. Subsequently, she conducted several research projects dissecting the economic competitiveness of US renewable energy firms in several industries.

    Since arriving at MIT, Glasmeier has taught classes on global energy industry and policy. Committed to informing public policy in the United States, she has completed a large number of policy reports for agencies and organizations that include the Ford Foundation, HUD, USDA Economic Research Service, The Appalachian Regional Commission, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, the Economic Policy Institute, the Aspen Institute, and the Department of Defense.

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Women in Leadership Keynote

  1. Heather Foust-Cummings

    Vice President and Center Leader, Catalyst Research Center for Equity in Business Leadership
    (Slides)
    foust-cummings-heather2Heather Foust-Cummings, PhD, leads the Catalyst Research Center for Equity in Business Leadership with a focus on understanding relationships between diversity, corporate governance, and board and firm performance. As part of the tenth anniversary Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500, Dr. Foust-Cummings profiled the experiences of women board directors of companies that had demonstrated a sustained commitment over time to having a significant proportion of women on the board. Additionally, she examines the role of sponsors in influencing the advancement and retention of senior-level and high-potential women and men, which she speaks about frequently.

    Prior to joining Catalyst, Dr. Foust-Cummings taught at Columbia University and conducted brand analyses for the Corporate Research Department at Young & Rubicam. Dr. Foust-Cummings received her PhD and MA in Political Science and a Certificate in Women’s Studies from Emory University; she received her BS in Political Science and Secondary Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

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Award Deliveries

Government Leadership
  1. Presented to Ghita Levenstein Carroll, Ph.D.

    Sustainability Coordinator, Boulder Valley School District
    carroll-ghita2Ghita Levenstein Carroll is the Sustainability Coordinator for the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD), located in Colorado. In this roll, Dr. Carroll is directing and coordinating existing efforts around sustainability, and garnering support and partnerships for further integrating sustainability into district operations and curriculum. Some of her successes include defining a vision and goals for district-wide environmental sustainability and receiving Board of Education approval for a policy that supports sustainability initiatives. She has significantly increased renewable energy technologies and green products throughout the district and implemented several energy, water and waste reduction strategies. Carroll emphasizes the educational opportunity in all of her projects, and has supported many new green teams throughout the school district. BVSD received the 2014 U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools District Award for this work. Previously, Dr. Carroll managed the energy program for CU-Boulder’s Environmental Center. One of her major accomplishments in that role was to develop and lead a university wind power campaign in 2000, making CU-Boulder the first school in the nation to raise student fees to support wind power and the largest university purchaser of wind at the time. Ghita received a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2008. Her dissertation work examined the relationship between emerging carbon markets and renewable energy markets. She has presented her work at forums such as the National Renewable Energy Marketing Conference, the First National Green Schools Conference, and conferences sponsored by the Electric Utility Industry and the American Wind Energy Association. Her work has been published in Energy Policy, Solar Today and by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Dr. Carroll is a LEED Green Associate and an Instructor for the Sustainable Practices Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She lives in Boulder with her husband and two children.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Joan Wills

    Chief Engineer and Program Leader, Cummins, Inc.
    wills-joanMs. Joan Wills has been working on reducing emissions and improving the fuel efficiency of diesel and natural gas engines for the past 16 years. She is currently Cummins’ Chief Engineer and Program Leader working to develop and implement Tier4 emission requirements on Cummins large diesel engines for locomotive, power generation, marine, mining, and oil and gas markets.

    Wills’ interest in clean energy and clean energy access really took root when she spent a year between her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering volunteering in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for a local rural development group. There she observed a very different way of life from her own. Access to clean energy was a key enabler to expanding life options beyond basic survival. When Wills returned to the United States, she combined this interest in clean energy with a passion for using math and science to understand and solve difficult problems. She attended Ohio State University and worked in the Center for Automotive Research, where she completed her thesis on gasoline engine controls.

    Wills joined Cummins after earning a MS in Electrical Engineering with a focus on system dynamics and controls. Early in her Cummins career, she developed advanced controls and diagnostics for engine and aftertreatment systems, including initial introduction of diesel aftertreatment technologies that enable lower engine-out emissions while optimizing fuel usage. Wills has 18 U.S. patents on diesel engine controls and diagnostics. She led Cummins’ Research and Technology Electronics function during a time when increasingly stringent emission regulations combined with new on-board diagnostics requirements expanded the need for sensing systems, signal processing, and multivariable controls to effectively optimize fuel usage while meeting emissions and diagnostic requirements. For the past three years, Wills has worked as Director of Technology Strategy, Planning, and Innovation. In this role, she works with Cummins technical leaders around the world to develop technology strategies ensuring that research plans and resources keep the company on the forefront of emission and efficiency technologies globally to meet current and future market needs.

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Business Leadership
  1. Presented to Zadhya Mohammed

    Head of Sales, Wind Service, Americas, Siemens
    mohammed-zadhya2Zadhya Mohammed has worked in the energy industry for 15 years and is leader in the business, as well as a mentor for Diversity at Siemens in the area of new employees, minorities, and women in the workplace.

    While completing her Masters in Mechanical Engineering, Zadhya started her career at Siemens as an intern, and was subsequently hired as a design engineer. She then worked in various teams that developed turbo-machinery for high efficient gas turbines, to reduce emissions, improve energy production, and improve the product cost for the ultimate sale to the customer. She then moved to a marketing role and was responsible for promoting and selling products and services to make the current North American customer fleet more efficient and affordable. During this time, Zadhya transitioned into management and also became involved in the Siemens Inclusion & Diversity Council, participating in a variety of formal and informal mentoring and leadership development initiatives, both internal and external to Siemens. These include participating in programs developed by the European School of Management & Technology and the nationwide Women UNLIMITED leadership development program. She is PMP and Six Sigma Green Belt certified.

    Zadhya is now in Siemens’ renewables division, as a senior marketing manager for the Americas. In this role, she is responsible for selling long term service contracts on wind turbines, as well as product upgrades to customers to improve energy output, as well as focusing on new markets in Central and South America. She continues to provide extensive mentoring to younger employees across various divisions of the corporation.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Karina Edmonds

    Executive Director for Institute Corporate Relations, California Institute of Technology
    edmonds-karinaDr. Karina Edmonds is a nationally recognized expert in the field of innovation, technology transfer, and commercialization. She recently completed a three-year appointment by the U.S. Secretary of Energy as the Technology Transfer Coordinator for the U.S. Department of Energy. In that role, Edmonds was responsible for working with the Department’s national laboratories to accelerate the process of moving discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace. She has also held positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and TRW, Inc. (now Northrop Grumman).

    Edmonds currently serves as the Executive Director for Institute Corporate Relations at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). She is responsible for implementing and managing an integrated strategy that transcends the Office of the Vice Provost of Research and attendant research portfolio supporting Caltech’s long-range strategies and interests involving the private sector and major federal government funding agencies.

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Making Wise Energy Investments in an Era of Constraints

Forward-looking leaders are addressing the competing goals of productive, affordable, low-carbon energy by establishing partnerships and programs to make their cities smarter and greener. We will have a discussion among public, private and non-profit innovators that are taking on these challenges.
(Slides)

  1. Moderated by Elena Alschuler

    Project Manager, Building Technologies, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy
    alschuler-elena2As a Project Manager in DOE’s Building Technologies Program, Ms. Alschuler is responsible for developing tools and standards that make it easier to manage, analyze and share empirical information about building energy performance, including the Buildings Performance Database, the SEED Platform and the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification. Elena is also leading DOE’s efforts to strengthen the evidence linking building energy performance with financial performance, and encourage commercial real estate appraisers, brokers, and lenders to fully incorporate these benefits in real estate transactions.

    Ms. Alschuler received a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. As a Research Assistant for the MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project, Elena worked closely with Duke Energy to design the Smart Energy Now commercial building advanced metering pilot in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina. Previously, she worked as a Senior Analyst at HR&A Advisors, where she served as the project manager for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA’s) Focus on Commercial Real Estate program.

Panelists
  1. Jacquelyn Dadakis

    Managing Director of GCE Services, Green Coast Enterprises
    dadakis-jacquelyn2Jackie is the Managing Director of GCE Services, the division of Green Coast Enterprises that provides strategic consulting services to property owners, municipalities, and utilities seeking to be more energy efficient.

    Before joining Green Coast, Jackie worked for Clean Energy Solutions, Inc. as a senior consultant developing innovative financing strategies for energy efficiency and creating community-utility partnerships for the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance and the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance under the Department of Energy BetterBuildings Program.

    Jackie also worked for Rebuilding Together, a national non-profit with affiliates in over 200 communities in the United States providing free home repair to low-income homeowners. As an Americorps VISTA, she launched Rebuilding Together’s response to Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast.

    Jackie holds a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Economics from Claremont McKenna College. She is a board member of the transit policy and advocacy organization, Ride New Orleans, and the ratepayer advocacy organization, the Alliance for Affordable Energy.

  2. Stacy Richards

    Founding Director, SEDA-Council of Governments’ Energy Resource Center (ERC)
    richards-stacy2Stacy Richards is the founding director of the SEDA-Council of Governments’ Energy Resource Center (ERC) which has provided technical assistance, education and training to public and private sector clients throughout 11 central Pennsylvania counties since 2005. She has pioneered community-wide energy independence projects in Pennsylvania and in 2013 authored Energizing Small Communities: A Guide to Greater Energy Independence and Economic Resilience, a national award-winning manual for use by communities to cost-effectively implement community-wide energy independence projects. As PA Department of Environmental Protection’s Deputy Secretary for Pollution Prevention and Compliance Assistance, Stacy initiated a variety of programs and policies that shifted PADEP and public and private sector organizations throughout the Commonwealth away from managing pollution to adopting best practices to prevent pollution and to reduce reliance on conventional fossil fuels. Stacy was introduced to renewable energy policy as a member of the White House staff under President Carter. Stacy served as Director of Government Affairs Director for the American Council of Engineering Companies and the URS Corporation in Washington. As agency coordinator for the Central Artery/Tunnel Project, Stacy managed a unique collaborative process under the National Environmental Policy Act that designed out thousands of regulatory and community concerns during the planning and design of the $14 billion urban transportation project in downtown Boston.

    She has served on the boards of numerous professional organizations including Women in Government Relations in Washington, DC, the Women’s Transportation Seminar, and the Renewable Resources Institute. Stacy works with local college and university faculty in central Pennsylvania to prepare students across many disciplines to address climate change challenges by introducing policies and best practices into course curriculums and providing real world experience to students through Energy Resource Center internships and class projects.
    Stacy holds a B.A. in Political Science from Bucknell University and an MPA from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

  3. Mary Barber

    Director, New Jersey Clean Energy, Environmental Defense Fund
    barber-mary2As EDF’s Director, New Jersey Clean Energy, Mary Barber focuses on climate and energy in New Jersey. She works with New Jersey’s Office of Clean Energy, the Board of Public Utilities, and the legislature to advocate for EDF’s clean energy priorities and guide the development of policies related to electric grid resiliency in the post-Sandy era. She’s also working to expand renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency and implement the finance mechanisms that help fund them.

    Before turning her attention to her home state of New Jersey, Mary led efforts in New York City to phase out dirty heating oils as part of the successful NYC Clean Heat program, which met its goal of halving soot emissions and led to the city’s cleanest air in over 50 years.
    In 2010, Mary launched EDF’s Investor Confidence Project (ICP), a system designed to develop building retrofit opportunities into reliable Investor Ready Energy Efficient™ projects. ICP uses a suite of commercial and multi-family energy efficiency protocols assembled from market best practices to prepare an energy efficiency project for investment. ICP is aimed at increasing investor confidence in energy efficiency and transforming it into an investable asset class with steady cash flow for both investors and building owners.

    Prior to joining EDF’s Clean Energy team, Mary was the director of EDF’s NYC Congestion Pricing campaign, a program designed to reduce air pollution, including greenhouse gases, in New York City by decreasing traffic and expanding mass transit.
    Mary has extensive experience in New York City government and nonprofit management. She served as chief of staff for a former New York City Council Member where she directed policy and legislative work. Following the City Council, Mary was the director of operations and external relations for a human services agency.

  4. Joyce Ferris

    Founder and Managing Partner, Blue Hill Partners LLC.
    ferris-joyce2Joyce has been an entrepreneur in the energy technology industry for close to 30 years and she is passionate about building businesses and projects in the sector. She has been an operating executive, investor, and/or active board member in eleven entrepreneurial companies with technologies and services related to improving efficiency and performance of lighting, air conditioning, ventilation, monitoring and control and providing cost effective solutions for on-site power generation. Prior to founding Blue Hill, Joyce was a senior founding executive and principal shareholder with Reading Energy, an early independent power company founded in 1985. At Reading Energy she managed energy project and corporate financial transactions totaling over $500 million. After Reading Energy, Joyce led the acquisition of Energy Products of Idaho (“EPI”), a combustion technology firm specializing in the efficient conversion of solid waste material to energy. After purchasing EPI she became a major shareholder and led business development and strategic partnerships for the company. Her energy project experience includes energy efficiency and on-site generation projects, biomass and agricultural waste fired energy projects, industrial waste disposal facilities, waste-coal fired power plants, geothermal, and hydroelectric projects.

    Joyce has held numerous board positions and is currently on the board of Aircuity, Nextility, Performance Systems Development, and Good Company Group. A recognized thought leader, Joyce is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and was recently named one of the Top Twenty Women Cleantech Investors. She holds a B.A. from Reed College in History and Philosophy (1981) and an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania in Energy Management and Policy (1985) with a concentration in finance at the Wharton School. She is a lifelong sailor and spends as much time on salt water as her work allows.

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Networking Afternoon

  1. MIT Tour

    As an urban campus hosting over 22,000 students, staff and faculty, MIT is a small city unto itself requiring energy solutions for both new and older buildings that span research and educational needs. Tour highlights of MIT’s innovative approach to campus energy –from a LEED Gold cancer research laboratory to the historic renovation of MIT’s Great Dome. Discover the technologies that drive energy efficiency within these buildings and learn how the campus is tied together by its district-energy system powered by cogeneration.

  2. Unstructured Networking

    This unstructured session will allow guests to mingle and socialize in a low-pressure networking environment.

  3. Speed Networking

    Inspired by speed dating, this high-energy structured networking session will provide the opportunity for a series of one-on-one conversations with other symposium guests.

  4. Lightning Presentations

    Undergraduate women from MIT will present their research in energy in quick succession with opportunities for brief questions.

  5. How to Organize a C3E Meet up

    Find out how to continue your involvement with C3E after the symposium ends. This panel will provide the information and tools to host a C3E meet up in your part of the country. We will discuss the logistics of putting together a local event, including: setting a theme, finding a space, and involving C3E Ambassadors or community members as speakers.
    Downloads: Meet up checklist for Organizers (.docx), Meet up deck (.ppt)

    Panelists

    C3E Ambassador Britt Ide, President, Ide Law and Strategy, PLLC
    Emily Dahl, Principal, E Dahl Communications
    Emily Kirsch, Co-Founder and CEO, SfunCube (Slides)
    Ann Shikany, Program Analyst, Energetics Incorporated

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Wednesday, September 17

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The Future Grid: Increased Clean Energy Integration and Reliability

Utilities are under pressure to modernize the grid using intelligent systems to achieve resilience and reliability. We will explore the best ways to achieve a smart and green grid, as the share of the population living in urban areas grows and decentralized power producers proliferate.

  1. Moderated by C3E Ambassador Katherine Hamilton

    Principal, 38 North Solutions
    hamilton-katherine2Katherine Hamilton is a principal at 38 North Solutions, a public policy firm focused on clean energy and innovation. Katherine served as President of the GridWise Alliance, advocating for nearly $5 billion in funding for smart grid projects in the Recovery Act. Prior to that role, Katherine was a policy advisor for Good Energies, Inc., a private investment company with a portfolio in clean energy technologies of nearly $6 billion. She co-directed the American Bioenergy Association, working with the states of Maryland and New Jersey to develop renewable portfolio standards. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Katherine led buildings research and then managed government relations in Washington, DC. Katherine spent a decade at Virginia Power, designing overhead and underground electrical systems for commercial and residential developments. Katherine studied electrical engineering at Northern Virginia Community College and holds degrees from Cornell University and the Sorbonne. Katherine is part of The Energy Gang podcast through Greentech Media.

Panelists
  1. Alison Silverstein

    President, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy
    silverstein-alison2Alison Silverstein is a consultant, lecturer and writer on electric transmission and reliability, energy efficiency, smart grid, renewable energy and technology adoption issues. She does extensive work on electric transmission issues for the U.S. Department of Energy, including work on the Department’s National Electric Transmission Congestion Studies. Silverstein serves as project manager for the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (a collaboration between DOE and the electric industry) and recently facilitated the multi-stakeholder Reliability Standards Working Group in Hawaii. She also advises a variety of private and governmental clients on technology, regulatory and other issues, and regularly reviews R&D projects for the U.S. Department of Energy R&D programs, Bonneville Power Administration, ARPA-e, and the Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture.

    Silverstein is President of the Board of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy and serves on the Board of Economic and Environmental Systems of the National Research Council and the Board of the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians. She is a member emeritus of the GridWise Architecture Council.

    Silverstein worked as Senior Energy Policy Advisor to Chairman Pat Wood, III, at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission from July 2001 through July 2004. She was a co-chair of the Electric Systems Investigation for the US-Canada Joint Power System Outage Task Force and principal author of the Interim and Final Blackout Reports on the 2003 Northeast blackout. Before moving to the FERC, she worked as Advisor to Chairman Wood at the Public Utility Commission of Texas for six years, covering both electricity and telecommunications matters. Silverstein has also worked for Pacific Gas & Electric Co., ICF Inc., the Environmental Law Institute, and the U.S. Department of Interior.

    Silverstein has a BA in Economics from the Johns Hopkins University, an MSE in Systems Analysis from Johns Hopkins, and an MBA from Stanford University. She lives with her family near Austin, Texas.

  2. Ann Berwick

    Chair, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities
    (Slides)
    berwick-ann2Ann Berwick was appointed Chair of the Department of Public Utilities by Governor Deval Patrick in June, 2010. She is also the president of the New England States Committee on Electricity and a member of the state’s Energy Facility Siting Board.

    Prior to being appointed chair of the DPU, Ann was the Commonwealth’s Undersecretary for Energy and also served as Acting Chair of the Energy Facility Siting Board. As Undersecretary, Ann was a key participant in the development of the Green Communities Act, the Patrick Administration’s signature energy legislation, and worked closely on its implementation with the state’s Department of Energy Resources and Department of Public Utilities. Ann worked with those agencies on a range of issues, including the introduction of a more progressive building code and the development of renewable resources in the Commonwealth.

    Before serving in the Patrick Administration Ann was a senior consultant at M.J. Bradley & Associates in Concord, Massachusetts. In that role she advised non-profit organizations and electric distribution and generating companies on a wide range of issues, including developments in state and federal energy and environmental law, regulation, and policy.

    Ann served as Chief of the Environmental Protection Division in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office from 1991 to 1996, where she exercised joint oversight of the Massachusetts Environmental Strike Force. From 1996 to 1997 she worked in the Alaska Attorney General’s Office, where she participated in litigation before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. She has also been a legal services attorney, and a partner in the litigation department at the Boston law firm Goulston & Storrs.

    Ann holds a B.A. from Radcliffe College and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin Law School. She has four grown children and lives in Newton with her husband.

  3. Caroline Choi

    Vice President, Integrated Planning and Environmental Affairs, Southern California Edison
    choi-caroline2Caroline Choi is vice president, Integrated Planning and Environmental Affairs for Southern California Edison (SCE), responsible for analysis of critical federal and state energy and environmental policy, as well as analysis and development of an integrated, long-term environmental and energy strategy for SCE.
    Prior to joining SCE in 2012, Choi was executive director of Environmental Services & Strategy at Progress Energy, where she was responsible for leading environmental permitting, compliance and policy. She served the company in various roles, including director, Energy Policy & Strategy, and manager, Federal Public Affairs.

    Choi has served on various non-profit boards and is a board member of the National Forest Foundation and the California Advisory Board of The Trust for Public Lands. Choi has a bachelor’s degree in government from Dartmouth College.

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Award Deliveries

Entrepreneurial Leadership
  1. Presented to Lisa Dyson

    Chief Technology Officer, Kiverdi, Inc.
    dyson-lisa2Dr. Dyson is the CEO of Kiverdi, a next-generation sustainable oil company that converts CO2 and waste carbon gases into customized oils using the power of biotechnology. Dr. Dyson’s technical background began with a PhD in physics from MIT and has included research in bioengineering, energy and physics at Stanford University, UC Berkeley, Princeton University, UC San Francisco, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. Dr. Dyson was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of London, where she received a Master of Science degree, and has degrees in physics and mathematics from Brandeis University.

    Dr. Dyson has broad business experience developing corporate strategies in a number of industries including in packaging, energy, automotive, chemicals, telecommunications, travel, and non-profits. While at The Boston Consulting Group, Dr. Dyson worked with executives at multi-national corporations to help them solve strategic business problems including cutting operational costs, expanding internationally, franchising, developing governance structures, designing effective organizations and developing market entry strategies. Dr. Dyson’s entrepreneurial background began when she was on the founding team of an MIT start-up that received funding from Microsoft and later built and led a team that developed a technology that reached millions in volunteering campaigns.

    Among her recent accolades, Dr. Dyson was honored this year by the San Francisco Business Times as “One of the Most Influential Women in the Bay Area” for a second year in a row and was given their “Forty Under 40” award for her leadership.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Susan Petty

    President and Chief Technology Officer, Altarock Energy, Inc.
    petty-susanMs. Susan Petty is the Chief Technology Officer, President, and co-founder of AltaRock Energy, Inc. With more than 30 years of experience in the geothermal industry, her work has included all aspects of testing, evaluation, analysis, modeling, and optimization for geothermal wells, wellfields, and power plants. Petty has also negotiated geothermal lease agreements, power sales agreements, geothermal project financing agreements, and geothermal property sales and purchases, and she has completed policy studies for state and federal agencies. She has driven geothermal electrical generation projects in locations around the world, including California, Nevada, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Central America.

    In addition to her extensive experience in the private sector, Petty has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy in performing policy studies on the economic modeling of geothermal pricing and the impact of technology improvement on the cost of geothermal power. She has been instrumental in developing information, planning, and designing software for use in developing public policy in geothermal energy.

    Petty holds a BA from Princeton University in Geology and an MS in Groundwater Hydrology from the University of Hawaii.

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Research Leadership
  1. Presented to Sila Kiliccote

    Leader, Grid Integration Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    kiliccote-sila2Sila Kiliccote is a Research Scientist, the Group Leader of the Grid Integration Group and the Deputy of the Demand Response Research Center at the Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her research interests include use of demand response and distributed energy resources for distribution system operation, including quantifying resource availability, advanced control of loads, communication systems and optimization of distribution networks. She is the recipient of the leadership award in Smart Grid Acceleration from GridWeek in 2010.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Constance Lau

    President and Chief Executive Officer, Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc.
    lau-constanceMs. Constance H. Lau was named president and chief executive officer of Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) in May 2006. She also serves as chairman of Hawaiian Electric Company and chairman of American Savings Bank, HEI’s two principal operating subsidiaries.

    Born and raised in Honolulu, Lau joined the HEI companies in 1984, serving in many officer and director positions, including serving as an HEI director from 2006 and during 2001 to 2004. She is also a director and audit chair of Matson, Inc., the major shipping carrier to Hawaii.

    Since 2012, Lau has chaired the National Infrastructure Advisory Council, which advises President Barack Obama through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on the security of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors and their information systems, including both the energy and financial services sectors. In energy, she was named 2011 Woman of the Year by the Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment. Lau is a member of the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and serves on the boards of the Electric Power Research Institute, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Associated Electrical & Gas Insurance Services. In banking, she is a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco’s Twelfth District Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council, and she was one of U.S. Banker’s 25 Most Powerful Women in Banking for 2004, 2005, and 2006, when she headed American Savings Bank. Lau also serves on the boards of the Hawaii Business Roundtable, the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Punahou School, and the Consuelo Foundation, which helps women, children, and families in Hawaii and the Philippines.

    Lau graduated from Yale College with a BS in Administrative Sciences. She earned a JD from the University of California Hastings College of the Law and an MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is married to Russell Lau, vice chairman of Finance Enterprises, Ltd., and has three children.

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Keynote

  1. Governor Christine Todd Whitman

    Co-Chair, The Clean and Safe Energy Coalition
    whitman-christine2Governor Christine Todd Whitman has served as Co-Chair of the Clean and Safe Energy Coalition (CASEnergy Coalition) since the Coalition was formed in 2006. As Co-Chair, Governor Whitman connects with policy-makers, business associations, scholars and community leaders to discuss the benefits of nuclear energy and promote a diverse energy portfolio. Governor Whitman’s work with the CASEnergy Coalition helps to foster a fact-based public dialogue about nuclear energy, a critical part of the Coalition’s mission to support the increased use of nuclear power to ensure an affordable, clean and safe supply of electricity.

    Gov. Whitman served as Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2001 to 2003. She was the 50th Governor of New Jersey, serving from 1994 until 2001.

    Since leaving the EPA, Governor Whitman has served as President of The Whitman Strategy Group, a consulting firm specializing in energy and environmental issues.

  2. Introduced by Rob Stoner

    Deputy Director for Science and Technology, MIT Energy Initiative
    stoner-rob2Robert J. Stoner is an inventor and technology entrepreneur who has worked extensively in academia and industry throughout his career, having built and managed successful technology firms in the semiconductor, IT and optics industries. From 2007 through 2009 he lived and worked in Africa and India while serving in a variety of senior roles within the Clinton Foundation. Stoner also serves as co-Director of the Tata Center for Technology and Design at MIT, and is a member of the Science and Technology Committee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, which manages the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. His current research relates to energy technology and policy for developing countries. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from Queen’s University, and his Ph.D. from Brown University in condensed matter physics.

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Energy, Mobility, and the Shape of Future Cities

Our choices about how we travel in cities will have a significant impact on urban growth patterns. We will explore how the evolution of transportation options, including bike sharing, car sharing, and mass transit, directly influences decisions about whether cities expand up (increased density) or out (increased land use).

  1. Moderated by Susanne Rasmussen

    Director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division, Cambridge Community Development Department
    rasmussen-susanne2Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She also oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen has a master’s degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark.

Panelists
  1. Sonia Hamel

    Climate Protection Consultant
    (Slides)
    hamelSonia consults to foundations, non-profits and governments in the areas of climate, energy and transportation policy. She specializes in work with states to boost their climate programs and policies. For example, she is currently performing a study to design a carbon tax for Massachusetts, developing climate action plans with the Governor’s office in Rhode Island and working with Northeast states on ways of reducing emissions from the transportation sector.

    In the past few years, she has worked for organizations as diverse as: The Georgetown Climate Center, The Environmental League of Massachusetts, The State Smart Transportation Initiative, The British Embassy (in Washington, DC), Ceres, The Union of Concerned Scientists, The New England Clean Energy Council, The Barr Foundation, The Linden Trust, and The Energy Foundation.

    Previously, Sonia served the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for nearly 30 years, coordinating air quality, energy and climate protection programs. Based in the Office for Commonwealth Development, she was a founder and state lead in the development of the highly successful Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a regional cap and trade program for the electric sector. For nearly four years, Sonia guided the process as one of the three Steering Committee members with primary responsibility for the public stakeholder process, coordination of a multi-state working group and the regional economic analysis. During that time, she also wrote and developed the first Massachusetts Climate Protection Plan and launched the national Carbon Registry.

    Previously, Sonia was Massachusetts Director of Air Policy and Planning for 10 years developing one of the most aggressive air pollution programs in the U.S., with a focus on vehicle emission standards and power plant clean up. She helped to develop the nation’s first carbon regulations was the chief coordinator for the New England Governors’ and Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Action Plan in 2001, a sub-national climate plan and the first international climate agreement in the U.S. She was instrumental in the fight to maintain requirements for cleaner cars in the Commonwealth and throughout the US and is a big proponent of cleaner car technologies. Sonia has worked on climate issues since 1994 when she was appointed to the White House Advisory Committee on Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The first 12 years of her career was at the Boston Metropolitan Area at the Central Transportation Planning Staff on environmental issues as an urban planner and public participation coordinator.

  2. Shelley Poticha

    Director, Urban Solutions, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
    (Slides)
    poticha-shelley2Shelley Poticha serves as the director of the Urban Solutions program, building NRDC’s work for better cities that support thriving people. Urban Solutions brings the place-based work of NRDC together into a coordinated strategy and includes promoting transportation choices through mobility options, scaling up building energy efficiency, model green and equitable neighborhoods, sustainable food systems, green infrastructure and climate preparedness. Urban Solutions is the culmination of NRDC’s thinking and work for sustainable communities since the organization adopted the area as an institutional priority.

    Shelley is a longtime partner of NRDC in multiple initiatives including transportation policy reform, LEED-ND, and the creation of Smart Growth America. Prior to joining NRDC, Shelley was a senior advisor and director of the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Before joining HUD, she served as President and CEO of Reconnecting America, where she became a national leader for the reform of land use and transportation planning and policy with the goal of creating more sustainable and equitable development, particularly around transit stations. And prior to that, she served as Executive Director of the Congress for the New Urbanism.

    Shelley holds a Master of City Planning from the University of California at Berkeley and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She works in NRDC’s Washington office.

  3. Catherine Ross

    Director of the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development, Harry West Professor of City and Regional Planning, Deputy Director of the National Center for Transportation System Productivity and Management, Georgia Institute of Technology
    (Slides)
    ross-catherine2Dr. Catherine L. Ross is Harry West Professor and directs the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (CQGRD) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is Advance Professor in the School of City and Regional Planning in the College of Architecture and Deputy Director of the National Center for Transportation System Productivity and Management, a $14 million designation.

    An internationally known transportation and urban planner, Dr. Ross is one of the world’s expert on Megaregions and sustainability – how to bring together regions and cities on transportation, water, energy, land, housing, health to create great places to live that compete in a global world. Her book, Megaregions and Global Competitiveness (2009), is a leading reference funded by the Ford foundation. Her extensive research on regional resilience and sustainability focuses on water, energy and transportation and her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Lincoln Institute of Land Policy-China, and many local, city, and state governments throughout the country and abroad.
    Dr. Ross has published extensively and completed the Masters of Regional Planning Program and Doctoral Degree at Cornell University. She conducted her post-doctoral work at the University of California- Berkeley. Her recent book “Health Impact Assessment in the United States,” was published in 2014 by Springer.
    Dr. Ross served as the first Executive Director of the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority (GRTA), an innovative regional state agency created by the Georgia Legislature in 1999 to help counties out-of-compliance with clean air standards by implementing new transportation services and projects. She is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) and a former Urban Land Institute Fellow. Professor Ross is the 2014 Georgia Power Professor of Excellence.

    Dr. Ross is a member of the AAA Auto Club Group Board of Directors and serves on the executive committee and chairs the audit, finance and ethics committee. In July 2009, she was selected to advise the Obama Administration on the first-ever White House Office of Urban Affairs.

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Award Deliveries

International Leadership
  1. Presented to Ashley Murray Muspratt

    Founder and CEO of Waste Enterprisers Ltd, Waste Enterprisers Holding and Pivot Kenya
    muspratt-ashley2Ashley Muspratt is a waste-to-energy entrepreneur focused on using business to solve human waste management challenges in developing cities. She is the Founder & CEO of Waste Enterprisers Holding (USA)/Pivot Ltd (Kenya), a start-up company that converts human waste to solid fuel for industry. Ashley’s academic background includes a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley’s Energy & Resources Group and an M.S. from the university’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department. Her business background evolved over a childhood spent working at and helping manage her parents’ small businesses. Ashley is driven in her work by a passion for protecting the environment and a penchant for tackling global challenges.

    Ashley was named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2011, was a Fellow at the 2012 Unreasonable Institute and mentor at the 2014 Unreasonable Institute East Africa, and has been an invited speaker at numerous conferences, including Harvard’s Africa Business Conference, World Water Week (Stockholm), and World Biofuels Market (Rotterdam). She has published over 10 peer-reviewed journal articles in the sanitation and renewable energy literature.

    Ashley lives in Mombasa, Kenya, where Pivot is constructing a waste-to-fuel factory. When she’s not in CEO mode, she enjoys the outdoors, a variety of sports, cooking, reading, traveling, and crossword puzzles. In addition to Kenya, she has lived and worked in China and Ghana; conducted short-term assignments in India, Uganda, and Senegal; and traveled extensively across Europe, Southeast Asia, and the U.S.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Alla Weinstein

    Chief Executive Officer and President, Principle Power, Inc.
    weinstein-allaMs. Alla Weinstein is Chief Executive Officer and President of Principle Power, Inc., a company that supplies floating offshore wind systems. Before co-founding Principle Power, she was the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of AquaEnergy Group, a company that successfully developed a wave energy conversion technology that was acquired by a TSXV-listed renewable energy company, where she was the General Manager and a Director. Weinstein brings more than 35 years of industry experience building global engineering projects for companies like Honeywell and Boeing.

    Weinstein is a frequent speaker in the United States and Europe on the development of renewable energy and has served as the first President of the European Ocean Energy Association.

    Weinstein holds a Bachelor’s of Engineering in Electrical Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and an MBA from Thunderbird, the Garvin School of International Management.

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Law & Finance Leadership
  1. Presented to Phuong Young Phillips

    Assistant General Counsel, SolarCity Corporation
    phillips-phuong2Phuong Phillips is SolarCity Corporation’s Assistant General Counsel. SolarCity is the #1 solar installation company in the U.S. After working with SolarCity as its lead outside counsel, she joined the in-house team in 2011. Phuong leads the corporate and securities team and advises senior executives and the board of directors on a broad range of public company matters, including corporate governance, securities compliance, SEC reporting, internal and external communications and a variety of corporate transactions.

    As a key senior member of the SolarCity legal team, Phuong has helped drive the company’s rapid and enormous growth, particularly in managing such important transactions as the company’s IPO, convertible note financings, and first-of-their-kind solar asset securitization financings. She also recently has managed the development and anticipated deployment of an innovative financing platform for smaller investors to directly invest in clean energy projects, creating greater opportunities for clean energy investors and raising potentially up to hundreds of millions of dollars for the company to expand access to clean energy for customers. Phuong has played key roles in SolarCity’s acquisitions and integration of significant assets, technology and teams to support the company’s growth and to drive greater organizational and financial efficiencies.
    Previously, from 2003 to 2011, Phuong was an attorney at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, a premier national law firm focusing on technology companies. Phuong holds a B.A. in Communication Studies, with a specialization in Business Administration, and a J.D., both from the University of California, Los Angeles. Phuong also serves as chairwoman of the fundraising committee of her daughters’ public elementary school, as a board member of the local AYSO soccer league and as a manager of girls’ softball teams. Phuong lives with her husband and two young daughters in Los Altos, California.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Britt Ide

    President, Ide Law and Strategy, PLLC
    ide-brittMs. Britt Ide is a lawyer, an engineer, a student of economics, a policy enthusiast, and advocate of public involvement. More importantly, however, she is a connector, a big-picture thinker, and a catalyst for creative solutions. As Founder and President of Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, Ide uses her unique blend of communication, quick learning, and interpersonal skills to bring organizations and stakeholders together to create sustainable solutions.

    With more than 20 years of experience working with small and large organizations in energy, natural resources, engineering, retail, health, higher education, and nonprofit areas, Ide understands the critical role that strategy development, organizational alignment, and open communication play in creating practical solutions. She attended the S.J. Quinney School of Law at the University of Utah, Montana State University, Ohio State University, and Cornell University. Ide is admitted to the bars of Idaho, Montana, and Utah. In addition to her law degree, she holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering and an MS in Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in economics. Ide also completed the intensive Mediation Training at the Harvard Negotiation Institute.

    Ide’s work history includes positions at the Ohio and Utah Houses of Representatives, Battelle Memorial Institute, Boise Cascade, Albertsons, Healthwise, and Idaho Power Company. She serves on the board of directors of PCS Edventures, a public company that implements science, technology, engineering, and math education programs in all 50 states and 17 countries.

    Ide and her husband keep busy with two young children and like to mountain bike, hike, snowshoe, or read in rare free moments. She is active in the community and serves on the board of directors of the Idaho Nonprofit Center and on the advisory board of the Boise State University College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs.

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Remarks on Cities and Resilience

  1. C3E Ambassador Nancy Kete

    Managing Director, Rockefeller Foundation
    (Slides)
    kete-nancyDr. Nancy Kete joined the Rockefeller Foundation in January 2012. As Managing Director, she leads the foundation’s global work on resilience, including developing strategies and practices for infusing resilience thinking throughout the foundation’s work.

    During her 25-year career in government, civil society, and the private sector, Kete has provided technical, institutional, and managerial leadership on a number of major environmental and societal challenges. She has been a diplomat, a climate change negotiator, a social entrepreneur, and a highly successful fundraiser.

    Before joining the Foundation, Kete spent 13 years at the World Resources Institute, first as Director of the Climate, Energy, and Pollution Program and then as founder and Director of EMBARQ, a distinguished program that catalyzed environmentally sustainable transport solutions to improve quality of life in cities in Mexico, Brazil, India, Turkey, and the Andean region. Kete also served on President Obama’s National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. In her role as Senior Advisor on Corporate Safety and Risk Management, she provided recommendations on unilateral steps the industry should take to improve safety above and beyond what the regulations would require.

    Earlier in her career, Kete worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she led the development of the acid rain control title of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the first and as yet most successful application of market instruments for pollution control. She holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s in Geography from Southern Illinois University.

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Lifetime Achievement Award Delivery

Presented to
  1. Susan F. Tierney

    Managing Principal, Analysis Group
    tierney-susan2Sue Tierney is an expert on energy policy and economics, specializing in the electric and gas industries in the U.S. At Analysis Group in Boston, she has consulted to companies, governments, non-profit organizations, and others on energy markets, and economic and environmental regulation and strategy. She previously spent over a dozen years in state and federal government – as Assistant Secretary for Policy at the U.S. Department of Energy; and as cabinet officer for environmental affairs, public utility commissioner, and chair of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority in Massachusetts. She chairs the External Advisory Board of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, chairs the ClimateWorks Foundation Board, and is a director of World Resources Institute, the Alliance to Save Energy, and the Energy Foundation. She is a member of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Energy Project, and the China Sustainable Energy Program’s Policy Advisory Council. She recently co-chaired the NAESB Gas-Electric Harmonization Committee, was a member of the National Academy of Sciences panel on shale gas risk, and was co-lead author of the energy chapter of the National Climate Assessment. She served on the U.S. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (and its Shale Gas Subcommittee). She has published widely, and frequently speaks at industry conferences and lectures at universities. She earned her Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in regional planning at Cornell University, New York (where her mentor was a female professor), and her B.A. at Scripps College (a women’s college in California). She and her husband, John Tierney, have two grown sons, James and Tom.

Presented by
  1. C3E Ambassador Mary Anne Sullivan

    Partner and Practice Area Leader in the Energy Regulatory Practice, Hogan Lovells US LLP
    sullivan-mary-anne2Ms. Mary Anne Sullivan is the practice area leader for the energy regulatory practice at the law firm of Hogan Lovells US LLP. She has more than 25 years of experience as an energy lawyer. Sullivan has had direct involvement with virtually every segment of the energy industry and has represented clients on energy issues in administrative, regulatory, transactional, and litigation matters in both the private sector and the government. Her current practice primarily focuses on electricity regulatory matters and on transactional and regulatory matters involving climate change, nuclear and renewable energy, and advanced energy technologies. Chambers Global: The World’s Leading Lawyers has noted Sullivan’s “comprehensive understanding of the issues facing the energy industry.”

    Sullivan served as General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) from 1998 to 2001 and Deputy General Counsel for environment and nuclear programs from 1994 to 1998. She provided advice and counsel on electricity restructuring, the California electricity crisis, oil and gas policy, environmental compliance, global climate change, clean coal programs, the Northeast heating oil shortage, radioactive waste disposal, nuclear safety regulation, and privatization of uranium enrichment activities. Sullivan oversaw the legal support for the opening of the world’s first deep geologic disposal facility for radioactive waste and negotiated the first agreements with electric utilities regarding voluntary reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.

    Sullivan was a member of Hogan & Hartson’s energy group from 1977 to 1993. She represented oil, gas, coal, and electricity interests before DOE, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Department of Treasury, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in related litigation.

    Sullivan is a frequent public speaker and author of articles on a variety of energy and environmental law topics. She has testified before several congressional committees on various issues, has been a senior lecturer in law at Duke University Law School and a professorial lecturer in law at George Washington University Law School, and has served on the board of the Energy Bar Association.

  2. C3E Ambassador Marilyn Brown

    Professor, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology
    brown-marilynDr. Marilyn Brown is an endowed professor of energy policy in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), where she directs the Climate and Energy Policy Lab. She is a national leader in the analysis and interpretation of scenarios for a sustainable energy future.

    Before joining Georgia Tech in 2006, Brown managed the Efficiency, Renewables, and Electric Grid Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In 2010 she joined the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation’s largest public power provider, following President Obama’s nomination. Brown has written two textbooks on climate and energy issues and has authored more than 250 publications. Among her honors and awards, she is a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, for contributing to the report on Mitigation of Climate Change. Brown has served on six committees of the National Academies of Sciences, including the Committee on America’s Climate Choices and the Board of Energy and Environmental Systems. She co-founded the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance.

    Brown earned a PhD in Geography from Ohio State University; an MRP in Regional Planning from the University of Massachusetts; and a BA in Political Science from Rutgers University.

Remarks
  1. Andrea Okie

    Vice President, Analysis Group
    okie-andrea2Ms. Okie specializes in energy and environmental economics, strategy, and policy, with a focus on the electric and natural gas industries. She has consulted to companies, utilities, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations on a wide variety of energy and environmental-related matters.

    Her recent energy-related engagements have included evaluating the ability of states to deploy energy efficiency as a compliance mechanism for carbon regulation; quantifying the economic impacts of alternative renewable energy investments, including employment and income effects, on behalf of a large utility; analyzing the power system and macroeconomic impacts of the Northeast states’ use of Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative auction revenues; and evaluating the scope and performance of the independent market monitoring function at a regional transmission organization, including identifying gaps and opportunities for improvement, and preparing a report summarizing the results. In addition, Ms. Okie has provided analytic and strategic support for a utility’s development of a business plan for energy efficiency and demand-side management; examined issues surrounding fuel diversity in New York; assisted an oil company in negotiating a long-term liquefied natural gas supply contract; and managed a case team in evaluating claims of natural gas futures price manipulation. Ms. Okie has published articles and white papers in industry publications on topics such as demand response, offshore wind development, renewable energy market development, and the regulation of carbon emissions from power plants.

    Ms. Okie received her M.P.P. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her B.A. in economics from Colby College.

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The Future Talent Pipeline

As the clean energy economy grows, skilled workers are critical to its success. We need to continue to build a vibrant workforce to implement and manage clean technologies. We will explore how companies are thinking about today’s and tomorrow’s human capital needs, their STEM skill base needs, and their gender diversity needs.

  1. Moderated by Linda Silverman

    Lead for Workforce Development and Education, DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
    silverman-linda2Linda Silverman is the lead for workforce and education in the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. In that role, she focuses on workforce issues related to growing the clean energy economy, and enhancing the educational pipeline through multidisciplinary energy education resources, such as the Energy Literacy Framework. Prior to this, she spent 10 years as a Senior Advisor on renewable energy and climate change analytical issues, primarily focusing on international and market issues. From 1993 to 2001, Linda worked in DOE’s Office of Policy on climate change policy issues and served on the U.S. Government’s delegation to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. She came into the government as a Presidential Management Fellow. Linda holds a M.A. in International Affairs from the Johns Hopkins Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and a B.S. in Finance from the University of Colorado.

Panelists
  1. Pratima Rangarajan

    General Manager for Project Management & Strategic Marketing, General Electric, Energy Storage
    (Slides)
    rangarajan-pratima2Dr. Pratima Rangarajan is the General Manager for Product Management & Strategic Marketing at GE’s Energy Storage business. Pratima has 14 years of experience with GE in leadership and technology roles at GE’s Power & Water, NBC Universal and Global Research divisions. Prior to re-joining GE she served as the Senior VP of Research and Deputy Chief Technology Officer at Vestas Wind Systems. Pratima has a BS from MIT and a PhD from Princeton University, both in Chemical Engineering.

  2. Barbara Burger

    President, Chevron Technology Ventures
    (Slides)
    burger-barbara2Barbara J. Burger is president of Chevron Technology Ventures (CTV), a role she has held since June 1, 2013. CTV champions innovation, commercialization and integration of emerging technologies into the corporation and includes three business units: carbon and biofuels, emerging technologies and venture capital.

    Joining Chevron in 1987, Burger started as a research chemist at the Richmond Laboratory. After several technical assignments, she went on to a number of management positions of increasing responsibility in International Marketing, Chemicals, Technology Marketing and Lubricants. During her time in Lubricants, Burger held the positions of vice president of Base Oils; vice president of Europe, Africa, Middle East, based in London; vice president of Global Supply Chain and vice president of Supply Chain and Base Oils.

    Burger serves as a non-executive director for Caltex Australia Limited, an ASX100 company, of which Chevron is a 50 percent shareholder. She is also a director on the board of the Houston Technology Center, a technology and business incubator and is on the Board of Directors for the Houston Symphony. She serves on the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Laboratory External Advisory Council. Burger is the executive sponsor for Chevron’s industrial relationship with MIT and sits on the governing board and energy council for the MIT Energy Initiative.

    An active alumna of the University of Rochester, Burger is a founding member of the university’s San Francisco Bay Regional Cabinet and is also a member of the Texas Regional Cabinet. She is a member of the George Eastman Circle, the university’s leadership annual giving society and the Libraries’ Advisory Council. In 2012, she established the Barbara J. Burger Endowed Scholarship in the Sciences to support students pursuing degrees in biology, chemistry, earth and environmental sciences, or physics. Burger graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Rochester in 1983. She went on to receive a doctoral degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1987 and an academic honor M.B.A. in finance from the University of California, Berkeley in 1994.

  3. Sarah White

    Senior Associate, COWS, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    (Slides)
    white-sarah2Sarah L. White is a Senior Associate at the Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS), a national policy center at the University of Wisconsin dedicated to high-road economic development. Her work focuses on the intersection of labor, education, and energy policy at state and federal levels, and she is a national expert on jobs and training in the clean energy economy. White has written widely on education for sustainability and social change, including, most recently, Greener Reality: Resilience, Equity, and Skill Formation in a Cleaner U.S. Economy. She sits on the Leadership Council of the National Skills Coalition, chairs the National Working Group on Solar Career Pathways for the USDOE Solar Instructor Training Network, and served as the Secretary’s policy advisor for federal employment and training programs at Wisconsin’s Department of Workforce Development. Before settling in the Midwest, White for many years ran a USAID Development Education Program in New York, working to integrate academic and NGO efforts addressing poverty, food security and sustainable development. A labor historian and Fulbright Scholar, White holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and a B.A. from Wellesley College.

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Award Deliveries

Education Leadership
  1. Presented to Debra Rowe

    Professor, Oakland Community College
    rowe-debra2Dr. Rowe is the President of the U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development (www.uspartnership.org). The U.S. Partnership convenes members of the business, education, communities, government, and faith sectors of the U.S. and catalyzes national sustainability initiatives. Dr. Rowe is also co-founder of the Higher Education Associations Sustainability Consortium (www.aashe.org/heasc), founder/facilitator of the Disciplinary Associations’ Network for Sustainability (www.aashe.org/dans), Senior Fellow at Second Nature (www.secondnature.org) and Senior Advisor to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (www.aashe.org). She works with the private sector to catalyze successful business models for the triple bottom line of sustainability. She helps higher education faculty and staff, K-12 associations and other private and public institutions integrate sustainability into mission, curricula and training, research, policy, culture, purchasing and investments, facilities and operations, and community partnerships.

    Dr. Rowe has been staff consultant for a U.S. Department of Education funded project entitled “Sustainability Improves Student Learning” (http://serc.carleton.edu/sisl). Debra has also been professor of energy management and renewable energies for over 30 years at Oakland Community College (www.oaklandcc.edu/est). She has also developed curricula in sustainable development, products and processes and sustainable living. She also teaches Campus Sustainability and Corporate Sustainability for the University of Vermont. Dr. Rowe helps other colleges and universities create their energy management, renewable energies and sustainability programs.

    Dr Rowe is presently chairing the Technical Advisory Group and the Green Jobs Policy Community of Action for the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). In these roles, she convenes energy and sustainability experts, collects and reviews resources, and authors overarching documents for AACC’s Sustainability Education and Economic Development Resource Center (www.theSeedCenter.org). This Resource Center is designed to share curricula, partnership and civic engagement models, skills and competencies, quality criteria, promising practices and more resources relating to sustainability and green energy. Debra was also convener of the Detroit Green Skills Alliance, growing the green economy of Detroit while creating jobs for the Detroit area residents.
    Debra Rowe is often a keynote speaker at national and international education conferences. She is the author or editor of numerous publications, including the newly released encyclopedia, Achieving Sustainability: Vision, Principles and Practices.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Barbara Kates-Garnick

    Interim Director of Energy, Climate and Innovation Program, Center for International Environment and Resource Policy, The Fletcher School, Tufts University
    katesgarnick-barbaraDr. Kates-Garnick is a leader in the energy and environmental fields. With expertise in strategic decision making in complex organizations, the cost/benefit of implementing regulatory mandates, organizations’ responses to the challenge of change, and the adaption of emerging technologies, she has negotiated major energy mergers and settlements, devised public and private partnerships, and provided strategic advice during crisis situations. Kates-Garnick most recently served as Undersecretary of Energy for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. She teaches at The Fletcher School at Tufts, where she also serves as interim director of the Energy, Climate, and Innovation program at the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy.

    As Vice President of Corporate Affairs at KeySpan, Kates-Garnick directed government and media relations, crisis communications, and operations support in New England as well as corporate community outreach. As a path-breaker in the implementation of energy deregulation, she designed the strategy that led to the sale of the first deregulated electricity in the nation. Kates-Garnick has testified before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Energy and Power Subcommittee and numerous state legislatures and regulatory bodies. As a public utility commissioner in Massachusetts, she facilitated the adoption of its early energy efficiency programs. In her consulting practice, Kates-Garnick has provided advice on a wide range of economic and regulatory issues faced by the energy, environmental, and telecommunications industries as they confront change and transformation.

    Kates-Garnick currently serves on the executive committee of the board of The Partnership, the region’s foremost organization promoting talent of executives of color. She has served on the advisory board of the Posse Foundation and on the board of the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay. Kates-Garnick has a PhD in International Political Economy from The Fletcher School of Tufts University and an AB cum laude in Political Science from Bryn Mawr College. She was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Science and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, where her focus was on energy security.

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Advocacy Leadership
  1. Presented to Dorothy Barnett

    Executive Director, The Climate and Energy Project
    barnett-dorothy2As Executive Director of the Climate + Energy Project, Dorothy Barnett is leading the effort to address the Heartland’s energy future. Grounded in an approach based on prosperity and energy security, Barnett has been successful in convening diverse voices in a conservative region of the country.

    Prior to her position as Executive Director, Barnett served for 4 years as CEP’s Director of Energy and Transmission. This work put Dorothy on the ground in energy policy work at the local, state and regional level. In this capacity she also led innovative programs such as the Take Charge Challenge and the Heartland Alliance for Regional Transmission – both of which raised the profile for energy efficiency, transmission and wind energy in Kansas and beyond. CEP’s newest project is gathering the agricultural, energy and water sectors to highlight innovative farm advancements in water and energy conservation that also positively impact the bottom-line. Barnett coordinated a successful and far-reaching effort to defend the Kansas Renewable Portfolio Standard from special interest groups attacks on clean energy during the 2014 Kansas legislative session.

    CEP and Mrs. Barnett have been recognized with national media attention, including MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show for the innovative work being done in Kansas and across the Heartland. Barnett is frequently invited to speak on a range of clean energy topics including a recent presentation at Yale for a public forum of “The ‘C’ Words: Addressing Climate Change Without Talking About Climate Change – a Regional Perspective.”

    Barnett got her start in wind energy with the Reno County Wind Energy Task Force, which was awarded the Governor’s Energy Award for Energy Education in 2008. Dorothy has a BA in organizational management from Friends University.

  2. Presented by C3E Ambassador Kim Saylors-Laster

    Vice President, Energy, Wal-Mart
    saylorlaster-kimMs. Kim Saylors-Laster is the Vice President of Energy for Walmart. Saylors-Laster and her team are responsible for natural gas procurement within the United States and electricity procurement in the United States and the United Kingdom. The team also provides guidance to energy markets within Walmart’s international trade areas. She is an executive champion of a number of renewable energy and energy efficiency initiatives within the Walmart Sustainability Networks. After joining Walmart in 1994, Saylors-Laster held leadership roles on the Real Estate and Global Compliance teams before joining the Energy team in 2006.

    Saylors-Laster sits on the Texas Energy Management and Innovation Advisory Board at the McCombs School of Business and is a board member for Empower-A-Child. She is an Arkansas-licensed attorney, an Arkansas-licensed Associate Counselor, and a volunteer counselor at the Samaritan Community Center in Rogers, Arkansas.

award-delivery-advocacy-dorothy-barnett

Poster Session Awards

  1. Presented by C3E Ambassador Seth R. Weissman

    Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, SolarCity Corporation
    weissman-sethMr. Seth Weissman is responsible for all aspects of SolarCity’s legal affairs, including transactional, governance, intellectual property, real estate, and employment matters. He brings 20 years of experience representing Silicon Valley companies of all sizes and types during their maturation.

    Before joining SolarCity, Weissman was Vice President, General Counsel, and Chief Privacy officer at Coremetrics, the leading digital marketing company. Prior to Coremetrics, he was an attorney practicing in both the employment and corporate departments at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati (WSGR) in Palo Alto, California, the leading law firm representing technology companies at all stages of their growth and the investment banks and venture capital firms that finance them. Prior to WSGR, Weissman was an attorney with Stoneman, Chandler and Miller and Hutchins, Wheeler and Dittmar (acquired by Nixon Peabody), both in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Weissman earned his undergraduate degree in political science at Pennsylvania State University and earned his law degree, with honors, at Boston University School of Law.

award-delivery-advocacy-dorothy-barnett

Closing Remarks

  1. Amy Glasmeier

    Professor of Economic Geography and Regional Planning, MIT
    glasmeier-amy2 Dr. Amy Glasmeier holds a professional masters and PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley. From 2009 to 2013, she was the Department Head of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. She serves as a professor of economic geography and regional planning and is Co-Chair of the Energy Education Task Force of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI).

    She received a Distinguished Scholarship Honors from the Association of American Geographers (AAG) at the Association’s annual meeting in 2014 for her data-rich insights into the geographies of economic development and planning, her research on patterns and trends in rural poverty in America, and her outstanding efforts to understand and inform public policy.

    Glasmeier is the author and co-author of several monographs – including Manufacturing Time: Global Competition in the World Watch Industry 1750-2000; High-tech Potential: Economic Development in Rural America; From Combines to Computers: Rural Services and Development in the Age of Information Technology; and High Tech America – as well as the Atlas of Poverty in America. These books reflect the topics of her articles, book chapters and policy reports where she has provided important insights into the development of industrial complexes and high-tech industries, geographies of trade policy and globalization, the failures and successes of efforts to end poverty, and the landscape of inequality in the United States.

    Her work assesses public policy through careful empirical analysis of economic and census data. One key contribution is Glasmeier’s focus on the unintended effects of public policy, especially in rural America, documenting the impacts of NAFTA, high-tech industries and federal economic development programs on the poor and the prosperity of rural communities.

    Glasmeier’s research and policy contributions in the field of energy dateback to 1970s, when she contributed to the first California university system-wide public outreach program around renewable energy. During the 1980s Glasmeier developed expertise in the fields of boomtown impact analysis and energy development in the western United States.

    For almost two decades, Glasmeier provided key technical support for the Appalachian Regional Commission, a federal state agency with geographic responsibility for economic and social development of the nation’s eastern coalfields, among the poorest communities in the US. As part of a team, Glasmeier developed the agency’s first region-wide energy policy, departing significantly from the previous reliance on coal toward a more balanced program emphasizing renewable and non renewable energy sources. Subsequently, she conducted several research projects dissecting the economic competitiveness of US renewable energy firms in several industries.

    Since arriving at MIT, Glasmeier has taught classes on global energy industry and policy. Committed to informing public policy in the United States, she has completed a large number of policy reports for agencies and organizations that include the Ford Foundation, HUD, USDA Economic Research Service, The Appalachian Regional Commission, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, the Economic Policy Institute, the Aspen Institute, and the Department of Defense.

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  1. Elena Alschuler

    Project Manager, Building Technologies, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy

    alschuler-elena2
    As a Project Manager in DOE’s Building Technologies Program, Ms. Alschuler is responsible for developing tools and standards that make it easier to manage, analyze and share empirical information about building energy performance, including the Buildings Performance Database, the SEED Platform and the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification. Elena is also leading DOE’s efforts to strengthen the evidence linking building energy performance with financial performance, and encourage commercial real estate appraisers, brokers, and lenders to fully incorporate these benefits in real estate transactions.

    Ms. Alschuler received a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. As a Research Assistant for the MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project, Elena worked closely with Duke Energy to design the Smart Energy Now commercial building advanced metering pilot in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina. Previously, she worked as a Senior Analyst at HR&A Advisors, where she served as the project manager for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s (NYSERDA’s) Focus on Commercial Real Estate program.

  2. Mary Barber

    Director, New Jersey Clean Energy, Environmental Defense Fund

    barber-mary2
    As EDF’s Director, New Jersey Clean Energy, Mary Barber focuses on climate and energy in New Jersey. She works with New Jersey’s Office of Clean Energy, the Board of Public Utilities, and the legislature to advocate for EDF’s clean energy priorities and guide the development of policies related to electric grid resiliency in the post-Sandy era. She’s also working to expand renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency and implement the finance mechanisms that help fund them.

    Before turning her attention to her home state of New Jersey, Mary led efforts in New York City to phase out dirty heating oils as part of the successful NYC Clean Heat program, which met its goal of halving soot emissions and led to the city’s cleanest air in over 50 years.
    In 2010, Mary launched EDF’s Investor Confidence Project (ICP), a system designed to develop building retrofit opportunities into reliable Investor Ready Energy Efficient™ projects. ICP uses a suite of commercial and multi-family energy efficiency protocols assembled from market best practices to prepare an energy efficiency project for investment. ICP is aimed at increasing investor confidence in energy efficiency and transforming it into an investable asset class with steady cash flow for both investors and building owners.

    Prior to joining EDF’s Clean Energy team, Mary was the director of EDF’s NYC Congestion Pricing campaign, a program designed to reduce air pollution, including greenhouse gases, in New York City by decreasing traffic and expanding mass transit.
    Mary has extensive experience in New York City government and nonprofit management. She served as chief of staff for a former New York City Council Member where she directed policy and legislative work. Following the City Council, Mary was the director of operations and external relations for a human services agency.

  3. Ann Berwick

    Chair, Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities

    berwick-ann2
    Ann Berwick was appointed Chair of the Department of Public Utilities by Governor Deval Patrick in June, 2010. She is also the president of the New England States Committee on Electricity and a member of the state’s Energy Facility Siting Board.

    Prior to being appointed chair of the DPU, Ann was the Commonwealth’s Undersecretary for Energy and also served as Acting Chair of the Energy Facility Siting Board. As Undersecretary, Ann was a key participant in the development of the Green Communities Act, the Patrick Administration’s signature energy legislation, and worked closely on its implementation with the state’s Department of Energy Resources and Department of Public Utilities. Ann worked with those agencies on a range of issues, including the introduction of a more progressive building code and the development of renewable resources in the Commonwealth.

    Before serving in the Patrick Administration Ann was a senior consultant at M.J. Bradley & Associates in Concord, Massachusetts. In that role she advised non-profit organizations and electric distribution and generating companies on a wide range of issues, including developments in state and federal energy and environmental law, regulation, and policy.

    Ann served as Chief of the Environmental Protection Division in the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office from 1991 to 1996, where she exercised joint oversight of the Massachusetts Environmental Strike Force. From 1996 to 1997 she worked in the Alaska Attorney General’s Office, where she participated in litigation before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the U.S. Supreme Court. She has also been a legal services attorney, and a partner in the litigation department at the Boston law firm Goulston & Storrs.

    Ann holds a B.A. from Radcliffe College and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin Law School. She has four grown children and lives in Newton with her husband.

  4. Martha Broad

    Executive Director, MIT Energy Initiative

    broad-martha
    Ms. Martha Broad is the Executive Director of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI), which addresses global energy challenges through member-sponsored research, education, and outreach programs. As part of the MITEI leadership team, she is helping to link science, innovation, and policy to transform the world’s energy systems.

    With more than 20 years of experience in organizational management in the energy and sustainability fields, Broad has worked extensively with business, government, and nonprofit stakeholders to forge successful public-private partnerships. She works closely with MIT member companies who together have pledged over $30 million annually for MIT research on a spectrum of topics, including energy storage, energy efficiency, and renewable energy technologies.

    Prior to MITEI, Broad was the Director of Knowledge Development at the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, the first state agency to focus primarily on clean energy economic development. During her nine-year tenure, she managed a number of award-winning programs related to green electricity, wind development, and the commercialization of clean energy technologies.

    Broad began her career as a Capitol Hill lobbyist for the Natural Resources Defense Council, earned an MBA from the Yale School of Management, and subsequently launched and managed two successful green companies: a unique for-profit green auto insurance agency owned by the Conservation Law Foundation, and the Rainforest Crunch (candy) Company, a Ben and Jerry’s spin-off that sourced sustainably harvested Amazon rainforest ingredients and donated profits to rainforest preservation.

  5. Marilyn Brown

    Professor, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

    brown-marilyn
    Dr. Marilyn Brown is an endowed professor of energy policy in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), where she directs the Climate and Energy Policy Lab. She is a national leader in the analysis and interpretation of scenarios for a sustainable energy future.

    Before joining Georgia Tech in 2006, Brown managed the Efficiency, Renewables, and Electric Grid Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In 2010 she joined the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority, the nation’s largest public power provider, following President Obama’s nomination. Brown has written two textbooks on climate and energy issues and has authored more than 250 publications. Among her honors and awards, she is a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, for contributing to the report on Mitigation of Climate Change. Brown has served on six committees of the National Academies of Sciences, including the Committee on America’s Climate Choices and the Board of Energy and Environmental Systems. She co-founded the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance.

    Brown earned a PhD in Geography from Ohio State University; an MRP in Regional Planning from the University of Massachusetts; and a BA in Political Science from Rutgers University.

  6. Barbara Burger

    President, Chevron Technology Ventures

    burger-barbara2
    Barbara J. Burger is president of Chevron Technology Ventures (CTV), a role she has held since June 1, 2013. CTV champions innovation, commercialization and integration of emerging technologies into the corporation and includes three business units: carbon and biofuels, emerging technologies and venture capital.

    Joining Chevron in 1987, Burger started as a research chemist at the Richmond Laboratory. After several technical assignments, she went on to a number of management positions of increasing responsibility in International Marketing, Chemicals, Technology Marketing and Lubricants. During her time in Lubricants, Burger held the positions of vice president of Base Oils; vice president of Europe, Africa, Middle East, based in London; vice president of Global Supply Chain and vice president of Supply Chain and Base Oils.

    Burger serves as a non-executive director for Caltex Australia Limited, an ASX100 company, of which Chevron is a 50 percent shareholder. She is also a director on the board of the Houston Technology Center, a technology and business incubator and is on the Board of Directors for the Houston Symphony. She serves on the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Laboratory External Advisory Council. Burger is the executive sponsor for Chevron’s industrial relationship with MIT and sits on the governing board and energy council for the MIT Energy Initiative.

    An active alumna of the University of Rochester, Burger is a founding member of the university’s San Francisco Bay Regional Cabinet and is also a member of the Texas Regional Cabinet. She is a member of the George Eastman Circle, the university’s leadership annual giving society and the Libraries’ Advisory Council. In 2012, she established the Barbara J. Burger Endowed Scholarship in the Sciences to support students pursuing degrees in biology, chemistry, earth and environmental sciences, or physics. Burger graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Rochester in 1983. She went on to receive a doctoral degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1987 and an academic honor M.B.A. in finance from the University of California, Berkeley in 1994.

  7. Caroline Choi

    Vice President, Integrated Planning and Environmental Affairs, Southern California Edison

    choi-caroline2
    Caroline Choi is vice president, Integrated Planning and Environmental Affairs for Southern California Edison (SCE), responsible for analysis of critical federal and state energy and environmental policy, as well as analysis and development of an integrated, long-term environmental and energy strategy for SCE.
    Prior to joining SCE in 2012, Choi was executive director of Environmental Services & Strategy at Progress Energy, where she was responsible for leading environmental permitting, compliance and policy. She served the company in various roles, including director, Energy Policy & Strategy, and manager, Federal Public Affairs.

    Choi has served on various non-profit boards and is a board member of the National Forest Foundation and the California Advisory Board of The Trust for Public Lands. Choi has a bachelor’s degree in government from Dartmouth College.

  8. Jacquelyn Dadakis

    Managing Director of GCE Services, Green Coast Enterprises

    dadakis-jacquelyn2
    Jackie is the Managing Director of GCE Services, the division of Green Coast Enterprises that provides strategic consulting services to property owners, municipalities, and utilities seeking to be more energy efficient.

    Before joining Green Coast, Jackie worked for Clean Energy Solutions, Inc. as a senior consultant developing innovative financing strategies for energy efficiency and creating community-utility partnerships for the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance and the Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance under the Department of Energy BetterBuildings Program.

    Jackie also worked for Rebuilding Together, a national non-profit with affiliates in over 200 communities in the United States providing free home repair to low-income homeowners. As an Americorps VISTA, she launched Rebuilding Together’s response to Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast.

    Jackie holds a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Economics from Claremont McKenna College. She is a board member of the transit policy and advocacy organization, Ride New Orleans, and the ratepayer advocacy organization, the Alliance for Affordable Energy.

  9. Emily Dahl

    Principal, E Dahl Communications

    dahl-emily2
    Emily Dahl has more than a decade of professional strategic communications experience for mission-driven organizations in the public and private sectors, specializing in clean energy and sustainability. Prior to founding her own communications firm, she held senior communications roles at the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, Nexamp, and Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, and worked on President Obama’s reelection campaign in a combined digital communications and grassroots organizing role. Through her own small business, she advises nonprofits, government agencies, campaigns, and businesses on traditional and digital communications. Emily holds a BA in English and American Literature from Brandeis University, where she completed the Environmental Studies program and minored in Economics.
  10. Karina Edmonds

    Executive Director for Institute Corporate Relations, California Institute of Technology

    edmonds-karina
    Dr. Karina Edmonds is a nationally recognized expert in the field of innovation, technology transfer, and commercialization. She recently completed a three-year appointment by the U.S. Secretary of Energy as the Technology Transfer Coordinator for the U.S. Department of Energy. In that role, Edmonds was responsible for working with the Department’s national laboratories to accelerate the process of moving discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace. She has also held positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and TRW, Inc. (now Northrop Grumman).

    Edmonds currently serves as the Executive Director for Institute Corporate Relations at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). She is responsible for implementing and managing an integrated strategy that transcends the Office of the Vice Provost of Research and attendant research portfolio supporting Caltech’s long-range strategies and interests involving the private sector and major federal government funding agencies.

  11. Joyce Ferris

    Founder and Managing Partner, Blue Hill Partners LLC.

    ferris-joyce2
    Joyce has been an entrepreneur in the energy technology industry for close to 30 years and she is passionate about building businesses and projects in the sector. She has been an operating executive, investor, and/or active board member in eleven entrepreneurial companies with technologies and services related to improving efficiency and performance of lighting, air conditioning, ventilation, monitoring and control and providing cost effective solutions for on-site power generation. Prior to founding Blue Hill, Joyce was a senior founding executive and principal shareholder with Reading Energy, an early independent power company founded in 1985. At Reading Energy she managed energy project and corporate financial transactions totaling over $500 million. After Reading Energy, Joyce led the acquisition of Energy Products of Idaho (“EPI”), a combustion technology firm specializing in the efficient conversion of solid waste material to energy. After purchasing EPI she became a major shareholder and led business development and strategic partnerships for the company. Her energy project experience includes energy efficiency and on-site generation projects, biomass and agricultural waste fired energy projects, industrial waste disposal facilities, waste-coal fired power plants, geothermal, and hydroelectric projects.

    Joyce has held numerous board positions and is currently on the board of Aircuity, Nextility, Performance Systems Development, and Good Company Group. A recognized thought leader, Joyce is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and was recently named one of the Top Twenty Women Cleantech Investors. She holds a B.A. from Reed College in History and Philosophy (1981) and an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania in Energy Management and Policy (1985) with a concentration in finance at the Wharton School. She is a lifelong sailor and spends as much time on salt water as her work allows.

  12. Heather Foust-Cummings

    Vice President and Center Leader, Catalyst Research Center for Equity in Business Leadership

    foust-cummings-heather2
    Heather Foust-Cummings, PhD, leads the Catalyst Research Center for Equity in Business Leadership with a focus on understanding relationships between diversity, corporate governance, and board and firm performance. As part of the tenth anniversary Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500, Dr. Foust-Cummings profiled the experiences of women board directors of companies that had demonstrated a sustained commitment over time to having a significant proportion of women on the board. Additionally, she examines the role of sponsors in influencing the advancement and retention of senior-level and high-potential women and men, which she speaks about frequently.

    Prior to joining Catalyst, Dr. Foust-Cummings taught at Columbia University and conducted brand analyses for the Corporate Research Department at Young & Rubicam. Dr. Foust-Cummings received her PhD and MA in Political Science and a Certificate in Women’s Studies from Emory University; she received her BS in Political Science and Secondary Education from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

  13. Amy Glasmeier

    Professor of Economic Geography and Regional Planning, MIT

    glasmeier-amy2
    Dr. Amy Glasmeier holds a professional masters and PhD in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley. From 2009 to 2013, she was the Department Head of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT. She serves as a professor of economic geography and regional planning and is Co-Chair of the Energy Education Task Force of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI).

    She received a Distinguished Scholarship Honors from the Association of American Geographers (AAG) at the Association’s annual meeting in 2014 for her data-rich insights into the geographies of economic development and planning, her research on patterns and trends in rural poverty in America, and her outstanding efforts to understand and inform public policy.

    Glasmeier is the author and co-author of several monographs – including Manufacturing Time: Global Competition in the World Watch Industry 1750-2000; High-tech Potential: Economic Development in Rural America; From Combines to Computers: Rural Services and Development in the Age of Information Technology; and High Tech America – as well as the Atlas of Poverty in America. These books reflect the topics of her articles, book chapters and policy reports where she has provided important insights into the development of industrial complexes and high-tech industries, geographies of trade policy and globalization, the failures and successes of efforts to end poverty, and the landscape of inequality in the United States.

    Her work assesses public policy through careful empirical analysis of economic and census data. One key contribution is Glasmeier’s focus on the unintended effects of public policy, especially in rural America, documenting the impacts of NAFTA, high-tech industries and federal economic development programs on the poor and the prosperity of rural communities.

    Glasmeier’s research and policy contributions in the field of energy dateback to 1970s, when she contributed to the first California university system-wide public outreach program around renewable energy. During the 1980s Glasmeier developed expertise in the fields of boomtown impact analysis and energy development in the western United States.

    For almost two decades, Glasmeier provided key technical support for the Appalachian Regional Commission, a federal state agency with geographic responsibility for economic and social development of the nation’s eastern coalfields, among the poorest communities in the US. As part of a team, Glasmeier developed the agency’s first region-wide energy policy, departing significantly from the previous reliance on coal toward a more balanced program emphasizing renewable and non renewable energy sources. Subsequently, she conducted several research projects dissecting the economic competitiveness of US renewable energy firms in several industries.

    Since arriving at MIT, Glasmeier has taught classes on global energy industry and policy. Committed to informing public policy in the United States, she has completed a large number of policy reports for agencies and organizations that include the Ford Foundation, HUD, USDA Economic Research Service, The Appalachian Regional Commission, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, the Economic Policy Institute, the Aspen Institute, and the Department of Defense.

  14. Sonia Hamel

    Climate Protection Consultant

    hamel
    Sonia consults to foundations, non-profits and governments in the areas of climate, energy and transportation policy. She specializes in work with states to boost their climate programs and policies. For example, she is currently performing a study to design a carbon tax for Massachusetts, developing climate action plans with the Governor’s office in Rhode Island and working with Northeast states on ways of reducing emissions from the transportation sector.

    In the past few years, she has worked for organizations as diverse as: The Georgetown Climate Center, The Environmental League of Massachusetts, The State Smart Transportation Initiative, The British Embassy (in Washington, DC), Ceres, The Union of Concerned Scientists, The New England Clean Energy Council, The Barr Foundation, The Linden Trust, and The Energy Foundation.

    Previously, Sonia served the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for nearly 30 years, coordinating air quality, energy and climate protection programs. Based in the Office for Commonwealth Development, she was a founder and state lead in the development of the highly successful Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a regional cap and trade program for the electric sector. For nearly four years, Sonia guided the process as one of the three Steering Committee members with primary responsibility for the public stakeholder process, coordination of a multi-state working group and the regional economic analysis. During that time, she also wrote and developed the first Massachusetts Climate Protection Plan and launched the national Carbon Registry.

    Previously, Sonia was Massachusetts Director of Air Policy and Planning for 10 years developing one of the most aggressive air pollution programs in the U.S., with a focus on vehicle emission standards and power plant clean up. She helped to develop the nation’s first carbon regulations was the chief coordinator for the New England Governors’ and Eastern Canadian Premiers Climate Action Plan in 2001, a sub-national climate plan and the first international climate agreement in the U.S. She was instrumental in the fight to maintain requirements for cleaner cars in the Commonwealth and throughout the US and is a big proponent of cleaner car technologies. Sonia has worked on climate issues since 1994 when she was appointed to the White House Advisory Committee on Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions. The first 12 years of her career was at the Boston Metropolitan Area at the Central Transportation Planning Staff on environmental issues as an urban planner and public participation coordinator.

  15. Katherine Hamilton

    Principal, 38 North Solutions

    hamilton-katherine2
    Katherine Hamilton is a principal at 38 North Solutions, a public policy firm focused on clean energy and innovation. Katherine served as President of the GridWise Alliance, advocating for nearly $5 billion in funding for smart grid projects in the Recovery Act. Prior to that role, Katherine was a policy advisor for Good Energies, Inc., a private investment company with a portfolio in clean energy technologies of nearly $6 billion. She co-directed the American Bioenergy Association, working with the states of Maryland and New Jersey to develop renewable portfolio standards. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Katherine led buildings research and then managed government relations in Washington, DC. Katherine spent a decade at Virginia Power, designing overhead and underground electrical systems for commercial and residential developments. Katherine studied electrical engineering at Northern Virginia Community College and holds degrees from Cornell University and the Sorbonne. Katherine is part of The Energy Gang podcast through Greentech Media.
  16. Britt Ide

    President, Ide Law and Strategy, PLLC

    ide-britt
    Ms. Britt Ide is a lawyer, an engineer, a student of economics, a policy enthusiast, and advocate of public involvement. More importantly, however, she is a connector, a big-picture thinker, and a catalyst for creative solutions. As Founder and President of Ide Law & Strategy, PLLC, Ide uses her unique blend of communication, quick learning, and interpersonal skills to bring organizations and stakeholders together to create sustainable solutions.

    With more than 20 years of experience working with small and large organizations in energy, natural resources, engineering, retail, health, higher education, and nonprofit areas, Ide understands the critical role that strategy development, organizational alignment, and open communication play in creating practical solutions. She attended the S.J. Quinney School of Law at the University of Utah, Montana State University, Ohio State University, and Cornell University. Ide is admitted to the bars of Idaho, Montana, and Utah. In addition to her law degree, she holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering and an MS in Environmental Engineering with an emphasis in economics. Ide also completed the intensive Mediation Training at the Harvard Negotiation Institute.

    Ide’s work history includes positions at the Ohio and Utah Houses of Representatives, Battelle Memorial Institute, Boise Cascade, Albertsons, Healthwise, and Idaho Power Company. She serves on the board of directors of PCS Edventures, a public company that implements science, technology, engineering, and math education programs in all 50 states and 17 countries.

    Ide and her husband keep busy with two young children and like to mountain bike, hike, snowshoe, or read in rare free moments. She is active in the community and serves on the board of directors of the Idaho Nonprofit Center and on the advisory board of the Boise State University College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs.

  17. Barbara Kates-Garnick

    Interim Director of Energy, Climate and Innovation Program, Center for International Environment and Resource Policy, The Fletcher School, Tufts University

    katesgarnick-barbara
    Dr. Kates-Garnick is a leader in the energy and environmental fields. With expertise in strategic decision making in complex organizations, the cost/benefit of implementing regulatory mandates, organizations’ responses to the challenge of change, and the adaption of emerging technologies, she has negotiated major energy mergers and settlements, devised public and private partnerships, and provided strategic advice during crisis situations. Kates-Garnick most recently served as Undersecretary of Energy for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. She teaches at The Fletcher School at Tufts, where she also serves as interim director of the Energy, Climate, and Innovation program at the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy.

    As Vice President of Corporate Affairs at KeySpan, Kates-Garnick directed government and media relations, crisis communications, and operations support in New England as well as corporate community outreach. As a path-breaker in the implementation of energy deregulation, she designed the strategy that led to the sale of the first deregulated electricity in the nation. Kates-Garnick has testified before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Energy and Power Subcommittee and numerous state legislatures and regulatory bodies. As a public utility commissioner in Massachusetts, she facilitated the adoption of its early energy efficiency programs. In her consulting practice, Kates-Garnick has provided advice on a wide range of economic and regulatory issues faced by the energy, environmental, and telecommunications industries as they confront change and transformation.

    Kates-Garnick currently serves on the executive committee of the board of The Partnership, the region’s foremost organization promoting talent of executives of color. She has served on the advisory board of the Posse Foundation and on the board of the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay. Kates-Garnick has a PhD in International Political Economy from The Fletcher School of Tufts University and an AB cum laude in Political Science from Bryn Mawr College. She was a pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Science and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, where her focus was on energy security.

  18. Nancy Kete

    Managing Director, Rockefeller Foundation

    kete-nancy
    Dr. Nancy Kete joined the Rockefeller Foundation in January 2012. As Managing Director, she leads the foundation’s global work on resilience, including developing strategies and practices for infusing resilience thinking throughout the foundation’s work.

    During her 25-year career in government, civil society, and the private sector, Kete has provided technical, institutional, and managerial leadership on a number of major environmental and societal challenges. She has been a diplomat, a climate change negotiator, a social entrepreneur, and a highly successful fundraiser.

    Before joining the Foundation, Kete spent 13 years at the World Resources Institute, first as Director of the Climate, Energy, and Pollution Program and then as founder and Director of EMBARQ, a distinguished program that catalyzed environmentally sustainable transport solutions to improve quality of life in cities in Mexico, Brazil, India, Turkey, and the Andean region. Kete also served on President Obama’s National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. In her role as Senior Advisor on Corporate Safety and Risk Management, she provided recommendations on unilateral steps the industry should take to improve safety above and beyond what the regulations would require.

    Earlier in her career, Kete worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she led the development of the acid rain control title of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the first and as yet most successful application of market instruments for pollution control. She holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s in Geography from Southern Illinois University.

  19. Emily Kirsch

    Co-Founder and CEO, SfunCube

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    Emily Kirsch is Co-Founder and CEO of SfunCube, an incubator and accelerator helping solar tech entrepreneurs succeed. Based in Oakland, California, SfunCube houses 15 solar start-ups employing more than 150 people throughout the US and around the world. Prior to starting SfunCube, Emily worked with former advisor to President Obama, Van Jones, at the Ella Baker Center where she launched and led the Green Jobs Corps which is Oakland’s first green-job training program, the Climate Action Coalition which drafted and secured passage of the nation’s most ambitious Energy and Climate Action Plan, and Oakland Solar Mosaic which piloted Mosaic’s solar investment platform on four rooftops in Oakland. Emily co-authored the reports ‘Making Green Work’ and ‘Creating Climate Action in Your Community,’ is a 2011 New Leaders Council Alumni and a 2014 Young Climate Leaders Fellow.
  20. Constance Lau

    President and Chief Executive Officer, Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc.

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    Ms. Constance H. Lau was named president and chief executive officer of Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) in May 2006. She also serves as chairman of Hawaiian Electric Company and chairman of American Savings Bank, HEI’s two principal operating subsidiaries.

    Born and raised in Honolulu, Lau joined the HEI companies in 1984, serving in many officer and director positions, including serving as an HEI director from 2006 and during 2001 to 2004. She is also a director and audit chair of Matson, Inc., the major shipping carrier to Hawaii.

    Since 2012, Lau has chaired the National Infrastructure Advisory Council, which advises President Barack Obama through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on the security of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors and their information systems, including both the energy and financial services sectors. In energy, she was named 2011 Woman of the Year by the Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment. Lau is a member of the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and serves on the boards of the Electric Power Research Institute, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Associated Electrical & Gas Insurance Services. In banking, she is a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco’s Twelfth District Community Depository Institutions Advisory Council, and she was one of U.S. Banker’s 25 Most Powerful Women in Banking for 2004, 2005, and 2006, when she headed American Savings Bank. Lau also serves on the boards of the Hawaii Business Roundtable, the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, Punahou School, and the Consuelo Foundation, which helps women, children, and families in Hawaii and the Philippines.

    Lau graduated from Yale College with a BS in Administrative Sciences. She earned a JD from the University of California Hastings College of the Law and an MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business. She is married to Russell Lau, vice chairman of Finance Enterprises, Ltd., and has three children.

  21. Andrea Okie

    Vice President, Analysis Group

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    Ms. Okie specializes in energy and environmental economics, strategy, and policy, with a focus on the electric and natural gas industries. She has consulted to companies, utilities, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations on a wide variety of energy and environmental-related matters.

    Her recent energy-related engagements have included evaluating the ability of states to deploy energy efficiency as a compliance mechanism for carbon regulation; quantifying the economic impacts of alternative renewable energy investments, including employment and income effects, on behalf of a large utility; analyzing the power system and macroeconomic impacts of the Northeast states’ use of Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative auction revenues; and evaluating the scope and performance of the independent market monitoring function at a regional transmission organization, including identifying gaps and opportunities for improvement, and preparing a report summarizing the results. In addition, Ms. Okie has provided analytic and strategic support for a utility’s development of a business plan for energy efficiency and demand-side management; examined issues surrounding fuel diversity in New York; assisted an oil company in negotiating a long-term liquefied natural gas supply contract; and managed a case team in evaluating claims of natural gas futures price manipulation. Ms. Okie has published articles and white papers in industry publications on topics such as demand response, offshore wind development, renewable energy market development, and the regulation of carbon emissions from power plants.

    Ms. Okie received her M.P.P. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her B.A. in economics from Colby College.

  22. Susan Petty

    President and Chief Technology Officer, Altarock Energy, Inc.

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    Ms. Susan Petty is the Chief Technology Officer, President, and co-founder of AltaRock Energy, Inc. With more than 30 years of experience in the geothermal industry, her work has included all aspects of testing, evaluation, analysis, modeling, and optimization for geothermal wells, wellfields, and power plants. Petty has also negotiated geothermal lease agreements, power sales agreements, geothermal project financing agreements, and geothermal property sales and purchases, and she has completed policy studies for state and federal agencies. She has driven geothermal electrical generation projects in locations around the world, including California, Nevada, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Central America.

    In addition to her extensive experience in the private sector, Petty has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy in performing policy studies on the economic modeling of geothermal pricing and the impact of technology improvement on the cost of geothermal power. She has been instrumental in developing information, planning, and designing software for use in developing public policy in geothermal energy.

    Petty holds a BA from Princeton University in Geology and an MS in Groundwater Hydrology from the University of Hawaii.

  23. Shelley Poticha

    Director, Urban Solutions, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)

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    Shelley Poticha serves as the director of the Urban Solutions program, building NRDC’s work for better cities that support thriving people. Urban Solutions brings the place-based work of NRDC together into a coordinated strategy and includes promoting transportation choices through mobility options, scaling up building energy efficiency, model green and equitable neighborhoods, sustainable food systems, green infrastructure and climate preparedness. Urban Solutions is the culmination of NRDC’s thinking and work for sustainable communities since the organization adopted the area as an institutional priority.

    Shelley is a longtime partner of NRDC in multiple initiatives including transportation policy reform, LEED-ND, and the creation of Smart Growth America. Prior to joining NRDC, Shelley was a senior advisor and director of the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Before joining HUD, she served as President and CEO of Reconnecting America, where she became a national leader for the reform of land use and transportation planning and policy with the goal of creating more sustainable and equitable development, particularly around transit stations. And prior to that, she served as Executive Director of the Congress for the New Urbanism.

    Shelley holds a Master of City Planning from the University of California at Berkeley and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She works in NRDC’s Washington office.

  24. Pratima Rangarajan

    General Manager for Project Management & Strategic Marketing, General Electric, Energy Storage

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    Dr. Pratima Rangarajan is the General Manager for Product Management & Strategic Marketing at GE’s Energy Storage business. Pratima has 14 years of experience with GE in leadership and technology roles at GE’s Power & Water, NBC Universal and Global Research divisions. Prior to re-joining GE she served as the Senior VP of Research and Deputy Chief Technology Officer at Vestas Wind Systems. Pratima has a BS from MIT and a PhD from Princeton University, both in Chemical Engineering.
  25. Susanne Rasmussen

    Director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division, Cambridge Community Development Department

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    Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She also oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen has a master’s degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark.
  26. Stacy Richards

    Founding Director, SEDA-Council of Governments’ Energy Resource Center (ERC)

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    Stacy Richards is the founding director of the SEDA-Council of Governments’ Energy Resource Center (ERC) which has provided technical assistance, education and training to public and private sector clients throughout 11 central Pennsylvania counties since 2005. She has pioneered community-wide energy independence projects in Pennsylvania and in 2013 authored Energizing Small Communities: A Guide to Greater Energy Independence and Economic Resilience, a national award-winning manual for use by communities to cost-effectively implement community-wide energy independence projects. As PA Department of Environmental Protection’s Deputy Secretary for Pollution Prevention and Compliance Assistance, Stacy initiated a variety of programs and policies that shifted PADEP and public and private sector organizations throughout the Commonwealth away from managing pollution to adopting best practices to prevent pollution and to reduce reliance on conventional fossil fuels. Stacy was introduced to renewable energy policy as a member of the White House staff under President Carter. Stacy served as Director of Government Affairs Director for the American Council of Engineering Companies and the URS Corporation in Washington. As agency coordinator for the Central Artery/Tunnel Project, Stacy managed a unique collaborative process under the National Environmental Policy Act that designed out thousands of regulatory and community concerns during the planning and design of the $14 billion urban transportation project in downtown Boston.

    She has served on the boards of numerous professional organizations including Women in Government Relations in Washington, DC, the Women’s Transportation Seminar, and the Renewable Resources Institute. Stacy works with local college and university faculty in central Pennsylvania to prepare students across many disciplines to address climate change challenges by introducing policies and best practices into course curriculums and providing real world experience to students through Energy Resource Center internships and class projects.
    Stacy holds a B.A. in Political Science from Bucknell University and an MPA from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

  27. Catherine Ross

    Director of the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development, Harry West Professor of City and Regional Planning, Deputy Director of the National Center for Transportation System Productivity and Management, Georgia Institute of Technology

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    Dr. Catherine L. Ross is Harry West Professor and directs the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (CQGRD) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is Advance Professor in the School of City and Regional Planning in the College of Architecture and Deputy Director of the National Center for Transportation System Productivity and Management, a $14 million designation.

    An internationally known transportation and urban planner, Dr. Ross is one of the world’s expert on Megaregions and sustainability – how to bring together regions and cities on transportation, water, energy, land, housing, health to create great places to live that compete in a global world. Her book, Megaregions and Global Competitiveness (2009), is a leading reference funded by the Ford foundation. Her extensive research on regional resilience and sustainability focuses on water, energy and transportation and her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Ford Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Lincoln Institute of Land Policy-China, and many local, city, and state governments throughout the country and abroad.
    Dr. Ross has published extensively and completed the Masters of Regional Planning Program and Doctoral Degree at Cornell University. She conducted her post-doctoral work at the University of California- Berkeley. Her recent book “Health Impact Assessment in the United States,” was published in 2014 by Springer.
    Dr. Ross served as the first Executive Director of the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority (GRTA), an innovative regional state agency created by the Georgia Legislature in 1999 to help counties out-of-compliance with clean air standards by implementing new transportation services and projects. She is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) and a former Urban Land Institute Fellow. Professor Ross is the 2014 Georgia Power Professor of Excellence.

    Dr. Ross is a member of the AAA Auto Club Group Board of Directors and serves on the executive committee and chairs the audit, finance and ethics committee. In July 2009, she was selected to advise the Obama Administration on the first-ever White House Office of Urban Affairs.

  28. Kim Saylors-Laster

    Vice President, Energy, Wal-Mart

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    Ms. Kim Saylors-Laster is the Vice President of Energy for Walmart. Saylors-Laster and her team are responsible for natural gas procurement within the United States and electricity procurement in the United States and the United Kingdom. The team also provides guidance to energy markets within Walmart’s international trade areas. She is an executive champion of a number of renewable energy and energy efficiency initiatives within the Walmart Sustainability Networks. After joining Walmart in 1994, Saylors-Laster held leadership roles on the Real Estate and Global Compliance teams before joining the Energy team in 2006.

    Saylors-Laster sits on the Texas Energy Management and Innovation Advisory Board at the McCombs School of Business and is a board member for Empower-A-Child. She is an Arkansas-licensed attorney, an Arkansas-licensed Associate Counselor, and a volunteer counselor at the Samaritan Community Center in Rogers, Arkansas.

  29. Ann Shikany

    Program Analyst, Energetics Incorporated

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    Ann Shikany is Program Analyst at Energetics Incorporated, a technology and management consulting firm. In this role she supports the U.S. Department of Energy and private sector clients with economic and policy analysis for energy related projects. Prior to Energetics, Ms. Shikany spent two and half years at the Department of Energy. In the Office of Policy and International Affairs she was a member of the Clean Energy Ministerial Secretariat and helped launch the domestic Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) Women in Energy program. While she was in the Loan Programs Office she acted as Special Assistant to the Executive Director, during that time the office completed over $32.4 billion in loans and guarantees for innovative clean energy technologies and advanced technology vehicle manufacturers. Ms. Shikany received an MA from John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), with dual concentrations in international energy and finance, and a BA in Political Science from Kenyon College.
  30. Linda Silverman

    Lead for Workforce Development and Education, DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

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    Linda Silverman is the lead for workforce and education in the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. In that role, she focuses on workforce issues related to growing the clean energy economy, and enhancing the educational pipeline through multidisciplinary energy education resources, such as the Energy Literacy Framework. Prior to this, she spent 10 years as a Senior Advisor on renewable energy and climate change analytical issues, primarily focusing on international and market issues. From 1993 to 2001, Linda worked in DOE’s Office of Policy on climate change policy issues and served on the U.S. Government’s delegation to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol. She came into the government as a Presidential Management Fellow. Linda holds a M.A. in International Affairs from the Johns Hopkins Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and a B.S. in Finance from the University of Colorado.
  31. Alison Silverstein

    President, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy

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    Alison Silverstein is a consultant, lecturer and writer on electric transmission and reliability, energy efficiency, smart grid, renewable energy and technology adoption issues. She does extensive work on electric transmission issues for the U.S. Department of Energy, including work on the Department’s National Electric Transmission Congestion Studies. Silverstein serves as project manager for the North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (a collaboration between DOE and the electric industry) and recently facilitated the multi-stakeholder Reliability Standards Working Group in Hawaii. She also advises a variety of private and governmental clients on technology, regulatory and other issues, and regularly reviews R&D projects for the U.S. Department of Energy R&D programs, Bonneville Power Administration, ARPA-e, and the Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture.

    Silverstein is President of the Board of the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy and serves on the Board of Economic and Environmental Systems of the National Research Council and the Board of the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians. She is a member emeritus of the GridWise Architecture Council.

    Silverstein worked as Senior Energy Policy Advisor to Chairman Pat Wood, III, at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission from July 2001 through July 2004. She was a co-chair of the Electric Systems Investigation for the US-Canada Joint Power System Outage Task Force and principal author of the Interim and Final Blackout Reports on the 2003 Northeast blackout. Before moving to the FERC, she worked as Advisor to Chairman Wood at the Public Utility Commission of Texas for six years, covering both electricity and telecommunications matters. Silverstein has also worked for Pacific Gas & Electric Co., ICF Inc., the Environmental Law Institute, and the U.S. Department of Interior.

    Silverstein has a BA in Economics from the Johns Hopkins University, an MSE in Systems Analysis from Johns Hopkins, and an MBA from Stanford University. She lives with her family near Austin, Texas.

  32. Rob Stoner

    Deputy Director for Science and Technology, MIT Energy Initiative

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    Robert J. Stoner is an inventor and technology entrepreneur who has worked extensively in academia and industry throughout his career, having built and managed successful technology firms in the semiconductor, IT and optics industries. From 2007 through 2009 he lived and worked in Africa and India while serving in a variety of senior roles within the Clinton Foundation. Stoner also serves as co-Director of the Tata Center for Technology and Design at MIT, and is a member of the Science and Technology Committee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, which manages the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. His current research relates to energy technology and policy for developing countries. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from Queen’s University, and his Ph.D. from Brown University in condensed matter physics.
  33. Mary Anne Sullivan

    Partner and Practice Area Leader in the Energy Regulatory Practice, Hogan Lovells US LLP

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    Ms. Mary Anne Sullivan is the practice area leader for the energy regulatory practice at the law firm of Hogan Lovells US LLP. She has more than 25 years of experience as an energy lawyer. Sullivan has had direct involvement with virtually every segment of the energy industry and has represented clients on energy issues in administrative, regulatory, transactional, and litigation matters in both the private sector and the government. Her current practice primarily focuses on electricity regulatory matters and on transactional and regulatory matters involving climate change, nuclear and renewable energy, and advanced energy technologies. Chambers Global: The World’s Leading Lawyers has noted Sullivan’s “comprehensive understanding of the issues facing the energy industry.”

    Sullivan served as General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) from 1998 to 2001 and Deputy General Counsel for environment and nuclear programs from 1994 to 1998. She provided advice and counsel on electricity restructuring, the California electricity crisis, oil and gas policy, environmental compliance, global climate change, clean coal programs, the Northeast heating oil shortage, radioactive waste disposal, nuclear safety regulation, and privatization of uranium enrichment activities. Sullivan oversaw the legal support for the opening of the world’s first deep geologic disposal facility for radioactive waste and negotiated the first agreements with electric utilities regarding voluntary reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.

    Sullivan was a member of Hogan & Hartson’s energy group from 1977 to 1993. She represented oil, gas, coal, and electricity interests before DOE, the U.S. Department of the Interior, the U.S. Department of Treasury, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in related litigation.

    Sullivan is a frequent public speaker and author of articles on a variety of energy and environmental law topics. She has testified before several congressional committees on various issues, has been a senior lecturer in law at Duke University Law School and a professorial lecturer in law at George Washington University Law School, and has served on the board of the Energy Bar Association.

  34. Ahsha Tribble

    Senior Advisor to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy

    As a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ahsha Tribble works across the Department to define and integrate capabilities to carry out DOE’s responsibilities for emergency response, incident management, and Department and industry preparedness and short-term resilience actions – all in service of the Department’s efforts to enhance the security, reliability, and resilience of the nation’s energy infrastructure. Her role is a key part of the Secretary’s emphasis on strengthening management and performance across DOE. Prior to DOE, Dr. Tribble served over three years on the White House National Security Council. During that time, she served as the interim Deputy Homeland Security Advisor, Senior Director for Response, and Director of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience. She led or supported the White House response coordination for major disasters including Hurricanes Sandy and Irene; the Japanese earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster; major flooding on the Mississippi River and in Colorado; numerous tornado outbreaks; and the West, Texas chemical plant explosion. Prior to joining NSC, Dr. Tribble spent ten years in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Dr. Tribble received her B.S. in Mathematics/Actuarial Science (with a Minor in Business Administration) from Florida A&M University, M.S. in Meteorology from Florida State University, and Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.
  35. Alla Weinstein

    Chief Executive Officer and President, Principle Power, Inc.

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    Ms. Alla Weinstein is Chief Executive Officer and President of Principle Power, Inc., a company that supplies floating offshore wind systems. Before co-founding Principle Power, she was the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of AquaEnergy Group, a company that successfully developed a wave energy conversion technology that was acquired by a TSXV-listed renewable energy company, where she was the General Manager and a Director. Weinstein brings more than 35 years of industry experience building global engineering projects for companies like Honeywell and Boeing.

    Weinstein is a frequent speaker in the United States and Europe on the development of renewable energy and has served as the first President of the European Ocean Energy Association.

    Weinstein holds a Bachelor’s of Engineering in Electrical Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and an MBA from Thunderbird, the Garvin School of International Management.

  36. Seth R. Weissman

    Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, SolarCity Corporation

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    Mr. Seth Weissman is responsible for all aspects of SolarCity’s legal affairs, including transactional, governance, intellectual property, real estate, and employment matters. He brings 20 years of experience representing Silicon Valley companies of all sizes and types during their maturation.

    Before joining SolarCity, Weissman was Vice President, General Counsel, and Chief Privacy officer at Coremetrics, the leading digital marketing company. Prior to Coremetrics, he was an attorney practicing in both the employment and corporate departments at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati (WSGR) in Palo Alto, California, the leading law firm representing technology companies at all stages of their growth and the investment banks and venture capital firms that finance them. Prior to WSGR, Weissman was an attorney with Stoneman, Chandler and Miller and Hutchins, Wheeler and Dittmar (acquired by Nixon Peabody), both in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Weissman earned his undergraduate degree in political science at Pennsylvania State University and earned his law degree, with honors, at Boston University School of Law.

  37. Sarah White

    Senior Associate, COWS, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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    Sarah L. White is a Senior Associate at the Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS), a national policy center at the University of Wisconsin dedicated to high-road economic development. Her work focuses on the intersection of labor, education, and energy policy at state and federal levels, and she is a national expert on jobs and training in the clean energy economy. White has written widely on education for sustainability and social change, including, most recently, Greener Reality: Resilience, Equity, and Skill Formation in a Cleaner U.S. Economy. She sits on the Leadership Council of the National Skills Coalition, chairs the National Working Group on Solar Career Pathways for the USDOE Solar Instructor Training Network, and served as the Secretary’s policy advisor for federal employment and training programs at Wisconsin’s Department of Workforce Development. Before settling in the Midwest, White for many years ran a USAID Development Education Program in New York, working to integrate academic and NGO efforts addressing poverty, food security and sustainable development. A labor historian and Fulbright Scholar, White holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University and a B.A. from Wellesley College.
  38. Governor Christine Todd Whitman

    Co-Chair, The Clean and Safe Energy Coalition

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    Governor Christine Todd Whitman has served as Co-Chair of the Clean and Safe Energy Coalition (CASEnergy Coalition) since the Coalition was formed in 2006. As Co-Chair, Governor Whitman connects with policy-makers, business associations, scholars and community leaders to discuss the benefits of nuclear energy and promote a diverse energy portfolio. Governor Whitman’s work with the CASEnergy Coalition helps to foster a fact-based public dialogue about nuclear energy, a critical part of the Coalition’s mission to support the increased use of nuclear power to ensure an affordable, clean and safe supply of electricity.

    Gov. Whitman served as Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2001 to 2003. She was the 50th Governor of New Jersey, serving from 1994 until 2001.

    Since leaving the EPA, Governor Whitman has served as President of The Whitman Strategy Group, a consulting firm specializing in energy and environmental issues.

  39. Joan Wills

    Chief Engineer and Program Leader, Cummins, Inc.

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    Ms. Joan Wills has been working on reducing emissions and improving the fuel efficiency of diesel and natural gas engines for the past 16 years. She is currently Cummins’ Chief Engineer and Program Leader working to develop and implement Tier4 emission requirements on Cummins large diesel engines for locomotive, power generation, marine, mining, and oil and gas markets.

    Wills’ interest in clean energy and clean energy access really took root when she spent a year between her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering volunteering in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for a local rural development group. There she observed a very different way of life from her own. Access to clean energy was a key enabler to expanding life options beyond basic survival. When Wills returned to the United States, she combined this interest in clean energy with a passion for using math and science to understand and solve difficult problems. She attended Ohio State University and worked in the Center for Automotive Research, where she completed her thesis on gasoline engine controls.

    Wills joined Cummins after earning a MS in Electrical Engineering with a focus on system dynamics and controls. Early in her Cummins career, she developed advanced controls and diagnostics for engine and aftertreatment systems, including initial introduction of diesel aftertreatment technologies that enable lower engine-out emissions while optimizing fuel usage. Wills has 18 U.S. patents on diesel engine controls and diagnostics. She led Cummins’ Research and Technology Electronics function during a time when increasingly stringent emission regulations combined with new on-board diagnostics requirements expanded the need for sensing systems, signal processing, and multivariable controls to effectively optimize fuel usage while meeting emissions and diagnostic requirements. For the past three years, Wills has worked as Director of Technology Strategy, Planning, and Innovation. In this role, she works with Cummins technical leaders around the world to develop technology strategies ensuring that research plans and resources keep the company on the forefront of emission and efficiency technologies globally to meet current and future market needs.

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Graduate Student Poster Competition

C3E organizers invited students to enter into a research poster competition focused on clean energy policies, tools, or technologies that cities could be or are employing. Posters were presented at the symposium and guests voted to select three winners – two from the Policy Solutions category and one from the Technology Solutions category. Poster abstracts for the finalists are below and the winners are noted.

  1. 1. Policy Solutions: Adapting Urban Public Transport to Climate Change

    Two simultaneous trends are emerging: rapid urbanization and the increasing impacts of climate change. These trends present a growing need for urban transport decision-makers to take action to adapt to climate change and build climate-resilient infrastructure. As most are unaware of how to sensibly approach climate change adaptation, the following framework would be useful for decision-makers in adapting urban public transport to climate change.

    This framework involves six steps, as well as best practices, illustrated by a case study on Mexico City which was built from in-country research and interviews with local climate change and transport experts. The steps include assessing climate effects, assessing vulnerabilities, identifying adaptation measures, selecting measures, implementing measures, and monitoring and evaluation. Each step was applied to Mexico City as a case study, to explore how these steps may be applied, specifically to the bus rapid transit (BRT) system. This mode of transport is a low-carbon, cost-effective solution for urban mobility and economic growth, and is spreading widely throughout cities in Mexico and other developing countries. Using BRT as an example allows the urban transport adaptation framework to be easily scalable in other cities, exemplifying sustainable urban development with resilient infrastructure which also mitigates greenhouse gas emissions.

    The goal of the framework is to simplify the adaptation process of urban transport, granting decision-makers the ability to more easily take action to build resilient infrastructure in cities.

    Presented by Ilana Ginsberg: Studying Economics and International Relations at Johns Hopkins SAIS

     

     

  2. 2. Policy Solutions: Building Greener: LEED Certification and Market Competition

    Cities promoting green building practices through multi-tiered certification programs and policies could benefit from improved economic, human, and natural environments. When builders certify green practices the benefits are two-fold: first, improved building performance optimizes energy and resource streams; and second, certification as part of a nonmarket strategy enhances reputation for corporate social responsibility, a competitive asset in today’s market.

    This research uses data from Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified buildings across the US. Over time, competiting firms establish greener certifying buildings, suggesting a race to the top of green practices, enhanced through the tiered certification structure. The extent to which firms are willing to invest additional resources in order to attain higher degrees of certification, and in turn earn the ability to signal stakeholders, is also observed. The propensity to capture this signal becomes spatially clustered, indicating that the utility of green market signals increases with competition, despite some past results that indicate the value of certification decreases over time. Anecdotal evidence from LEED buildings across the United States confirm these trends, as neighboring firms attempt to “out-green” competition. Together, these three components provide robust evidence of competition in green development practices.

    By leveraging green construction and building management practices to enhance profits, building owners also produce positive externalities, including reduced emissions, habitat preservation, and increased alternative transportation opportunities for employees, customers, and the surrounding community.

    Presented by Mallory Flowers: Studying Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology

  3. 3. (Winner) Policy Solutions: Meeting the EPA Carbon Rules with SCRAPS: State-based Carbon Reduction Analysis for Power Systems

    On June 2, the EPA announced the Carbon Rules, a set rules for carbon emissions by existing power plants. These rules include specific mitigation goals that each state must meet by 2030, which will reduce the country’s carbon emissions from power plants by 30%. Although there are specific goals for each state, it is the responsibility of state agencies such as the Department of Environmental Quality and the Public Service Commission to create State Implementation Plans. These plans will consider state specific resources and demands, in addition to unique strategies to mitigate carbon. State agencies may face a challenge in creating these plans due to the complex nature of power systems and the need for sophisticated modeling software. Using Michigan as a test bed, this project provides an innovative tool for agencies to use in crafting State Implementation Plans. This tool, SCRAPS, is a dynamic, open-access model that is based in Excel. SCRAPS was designed specifically for the Carbon Rules, using the EPA’s four mitigation building blocks as a guide. The model approaches mitigation from an economic perspective, it meets a reduction goal by minimizing the cost of mitigation projects. This approach reflects the economic impact of the proposal on states’ economies and ratepayers. Stakeholders can use SCRAPS to consider different design policies and implementation strategies, such as collaborating with other states, or modifying system assumptions and resource availability. The Carbon Rules are a precedent setting step in our country’s fight against climate change and SCRAPS is a crucial tool for states to use to reach their goals and move towards a more sustainable future.

    Presented by Rachel Chalat: Studying Applied Economics and Science in Sustainable Systems at the University of Michigan

  4. 4. Policy Solutions: Renewable Transportation Fuels: Reducing Petroleum Dependence and Improving Air Quality in North Carolina

    In 2011, the transportation sector accounted for 28 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Americans travelled more than 8 billion miles per day in 2012 and this number is only expected to increase in the future. Decreasing diesel and gasoline vehicle usage and increasing electric and compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle usage in North Carolina were studied as a strategy to reduce petroleum dependence and improve the air quality. This analysis will inform policy-makers in long-term energy and transportation infrastructure planning.

    The capacity of renewable electricity (RE) and renewable natural gas (RNG) in North Carolina was calculated in gasoline gallon equivalents. The sources of RNG are derived from methane and were inventoried based on the 2013 permitted capacities of concentrated animal farm operations, wastewater treatment plants, and landfills. The energy capacities of solar, offshore wind, hydropower, and biomass were inventoried as RE.

    The Department of Energy’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation tool was used to determine petroleum consumption, GHG, and air pollution emissions up to 2030 for three specific cases. Case one establishes a baseline by assuming that gasoline and diesel consumption increases per historical adoption rates. Case two maximizes the adoption of RNG by replacing gasoline and diesel heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) with CNG vehicles. Case three integrates RE in light-duty vehicles (LDV) based on gradual adoption rates of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    Preliminary results indicate that RE resources are more than sufficient to replace gasoline in LDVs up to 2030. In contrast, existing resources of RNG in North Carolina are insufficient to replace gasoline and diesel in HDVs. Utilizing electricity in LDVs significantly reduces petroleum consumption, GHGs, and air pollutants at adoption rates of 50 percent or more. Using CNG in HDVs results in large reductions of petroleum and GHG emissions.

    Presented by Marie Patane Curtis: Studying City and Regional Planning and Environmental Science at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

  5. 5. (Winner) Policy Solutions: Resilience, Sustainability, and Improved Societal Outcomes: Water and Energy Strategies for Atlanta

    In the face of global climate change, the city of Atlanta, Georgia is facing many difficult decisions about how best develop new energy and water supply infrastructure for its expanding population. Distributed solar photovoltaics and rainwater harvesting are touted as two adaption strategies for decreasing grid vulnerability, increasing resilience, and fostering sustainable development. While these two infrastrucutre options have been analyzed seperately, to our knowledge, no study has examined the feedback effects of each technology option on the entire water-energy-climate system nor has a study attempted to analyze the impacts of integrating the two technology options. Furthermore, this is one of few studies to determine an adequate scale of projection for deployment in the urban setting. To analyze the impacts of distributed solar PV and rainwater harvesting, a specific integrated water- energy-climate-economic modeling tool was developed that can project the usage impact of each technology option on the entire grid system, according social costs and benefits, and overall resources impacts. The model is adapted to the Georgia electricity system and scaled to Atlanta’s water supply system. This model can be calibrated to evaluate a number of infrastructure trajectories as well as policy plans. Our model combines GIS land-use data, hourly load and consumption profiles, detailed information about solar insolation and precipitation rates, the health and welfare benefits of reduced pollution created by the AP2 model (Muller, Mendelsohn, & Nordhaus, 2011), capital and maintenance costs, degradation rates, water supply and electricity rates, withdrawal and consumption rates of water for electricity generation (scaled to technology source) as well as energy use rates for water supply. The model is used to analyze existing and possible policy scenarios. Our goal is to help policy-makers begin to understand the combined benefits of distributed supply options for energy and water in urban areas as well as determine a path for sustainable growth.

    Presented by Caroline Burkhard Golin: Studying Public Policy and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology

  6. 6. Policy Solutions: Secondary Use of Electric Vehicle Batteries for Energy Storage

    This poster is based on a literature review about the prospective secondary uses of electric vehicle (EV) batteries and a market assessment for New York City.
    Once batteries reach their end-of-life in an EV, they still have about 80% of their initial capacity, which could be used in energy storage applications. This would increase their total lifetime value, decrease the overall cost of energy storage for primary (automotive) and secondary (grid) customers, reduce environmental impacts, and increase the overall work of the device for the initial investments in capital, labor and energy.

    While the battery selling price and value to the automotive owner depend on new battery costs and repurposing costs, research indicates that even under conservative estimates the value to the owner is small and will not influence EV uptake. On the other hand, peak shaving, as well as power quality and reliability applications are cost effective and attractive to secondary users.

    These two applications are a good fit for New York City. In the first place, time-of-use electricity rates encourage the use of batteries to shift consumption to off-peak rates, allowing customers to reap benefits while reducing peak load. Second, the planned shutting down of the Indian Point nuclear plant in 2016 has led the government and the utility to put in place incentives to energy storage in order to assure power reliability. Finally, not only are New Yorkers willing to go green and to adopt the latest technologies, but also the massive power outages caused by hurricane Sandy will likely make them sensitive to energy storage options.

    To encourage secondary uses, the government and the utility could a) extend energy storage incentives beyond 2016; b) invest in a refurbishment facility; c) recognize EV and energy storage early adopters; d) offer EV batteries leases, and collect and refurbish them upon their end of life. It is worthwhile noting that this technology is applicable to other cities and regions with similar regulations and profiles.

    Presented by María Alegre: Studying Energy and Environment at Colombia University SIPA

  7. 1. (Winner) Technology Solutions: Assessing Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy for Small Communities Near Wetland Estuaries

    Tidal streams are high-speed, horizontal sea currents associated with the tide. Hydrokinetic turbines can be utilized to generate electricity from these flows similar to wind turbines. It has been estimated there is upwards of 50 GW of available tidal power along the US coast (Defne et al 2010). However, this valuable resource will be vastly underutilized because much of the coastal United States, despite having substantial tidal currents, do not have environments that are deep and wide enough to accommodate the requirements of the current technology. In particular, in the US Southeast shallow estuaries with wetlands foster high velocity tidal currents. While the estuaries cannot provide utility scale power, they can provide supplemental power to small coastal communities. A small community considering tidal energy is the Girl Scouts of America’s (GSA) Eco-Village found on Rose Dhu Island, GA.

    The purpose of this research is to characterize wetland hydrodynamics and assess the available tidal hydrokinetic energy surrounding Rose Dhu Island. A numerical model and measurements show the storage capacity of the wetlands dictates the timing and magnitude of currents, and the sinuous channel geometry dictates the migration of areas with high kinetic energy. For effective energy generation, currents must not only be strong but persistent. Using a numerical model and assuming a combined turbine size of 10m2, 45% device efficiency, and operating range above 0.5 m/s, it is estimated 5400 kWh could be provided yearly to the Eco-Village with little hydrodynamic disruption. A vertical axis turbine prototype was tested on-site. Turbine performance results will be used for modelling extraction and its environmental effects.

    In addition to intellectual research, interactive seminars were held with local schools and GSA troops to teach young girls about clean energy and sustainable energy practices, and to invoke a general excitement in STEM fields.

    Presented by Brittany Bruder: Studying Civil Engineering (Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Water Resources) at Georgia Institute of Technology

  8. 2. Technology Solutions: Net Load and Solar Resource Forecasting for High Solar Penetration Communities

    Forecasting of power load demand plays a significant role in the management and operation of the power grid. To compensate for the forecast errors and other power source failures, Independent System Operators (ISO) keep operating reserves that represent losses in the system at a financial burden to both utilities and rate-paying customers. However, the present grid is undergoing a very fast-paced change. With the increasing awareness about the adverse effects of conventional energy resources, policies are being developed to accelerate the utilization of renewable energy at ever higher penetration levels. The growth of solar power utilization has been staggering in the past decade: global solar capacity has increased from 1.76 GW to 102.15 GW over the past decade (2001-2012). Due to the stochastic nature of solar power, these increasing levels of solar penetration result in several planning and operational challenges. Therefore, net load forecasting i.e., the integration of demand load and renewable generation forecast techniques are needed to replace existing grid load management systems. The current state-of-the-art load forecast methodologies were reviewed and a novel ensemble re-forecasting technique was proposed. Proposed models showed consistent performance enhancements for various ISOs with improvements of up to 52% in terms of Mean Absolute Percentage error for hour-ahead and, 34% for day-ahead load forecasts. Also, the impact of an increasing solar penetration on load forecasts was studied. It was found that the load forecasting skill drops by 9% for the hour-ahead load forecast because of additional variability and uncertainty introduced by solar power. Analysis of the error distribution as a function of daily solar penetration for different levels of variability revealed that the solar power variability drives the forecast error magnitude whereas increasing penetration level has a much smaller contribution. Net load forecasting models for communities with centralized and distributed generation are under development for 15 minute to 48 hour forecast horizons.

    Presented by Amanpreet Kaur: Studying Mechanical Engineering at University of California, San Diego

  9. 3. Technology Solutions: Sustainable Urban Development: Modeling Future Growth Scenarios

    The rapid growth of cities calls for effective tools for the prediction of future trends in urban energy consumption, accounting for climate change and building-related interventions. This work presents a methodology for creating a calibrated energy model of an existing district and using it to analyze future development scenarios. The goal of the model is to allow planners to forecast with relative accuracy the effects of changing weather patterns and of various retrofits on a district’s energy consumption.

    The MIT campus was used as the pilot study for developing the proposed methodology. An energy model of the 138-building campus was created using Rhinoceros for 3-D geometry and the Operational Energy Module in UMI (Urban Modeling Interface developed by the Sustainable Design Lab at MIT) as an interface to the EnergyPlus simulation engine. This process involved the following steps: (1) collection of building information from floor plans, construction drawings, building audits, and measured energy use; (2) detailed modeling of selected buildings with thermal zoning, used to create templates for buildings of different functions; (3) application of the templates to buildings of the same function and simulation using UMI’s Shoeboxer algorithm, which automates the thermal zoning process; (4) adjustments to templates and calibration of individual buildings to monthly energy measurements from 2012.

    The baseline model was calibrated using 2012 Central Square weather station data. This weather file was morphed according to IPCC’s A2 climate change scenario prediction using the Climate Change World Weather File Generator (developed by the University of Southampton), creating weather files for 2020 and 2050. The calibrated model and weather files were then used to analyze (1) how much more energy the campus would consume in 2050 if no retrofits were performed, and (2) to what extent proposed retrofits would reduce campus energy consumption in order to enable future campus expansion on a net-zero carbon basis.

    Presented by Julia Sokol: Studying Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    and Aiko Nakano: Studying Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  10. 4. Technology Solutions: Urban Heating Implications on Energy Use and Fluid Flow

    Numerical fluid flow and heat transfer simulations of a three-dimensional idealized urban environment are performed and diurnal cycles of surface temperatures and energy balance components are studied. Unsteady simulations forced with solar load and realistic wind and temperature profiles are done with the finite volume solver ANSYS/FLUENT 14.5. In comparison with previous studies, our model has the advantage of considering the realistic surface heating that is caused by solar insolation and inter-building shadowing effects. Additionally, this poster demonstrates the strong three-dimensional interaction between turbulent flow and thermal fields and the necessity of dynamic-coupling of these forcings in numerical simulations of the urban environments. Thermal effects of urban geometry, surface albedo, wind direction and speed are numerically investigated for a clear summer day in Southern California. To characterize the flow, steady-state weather forcing taken at each hour of the day is translated into two different Richardson numbers indicating vertical atmospheric instability and solar tilt, respectively. Ground surface albedo was found to have the most influence on the urban facade temperature. Replacing asphalt with concrete as ground material increased the daytime surface temperature up to 8 K (2.5%). Additionally, urban built-up density outweighs effects of wind speed and direction with respect to the ground temperature and energy balance.

    Convective heat transfer, mean flow and turbulence statistics are also investigated as determinants for buildings and urban street ventilation. Air exchange rate (ACH) and Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients (CHTC) are used to characterize the ventilation performance. It is found that both parameters depend strongly on the orientation of the heated wall in relation to wind direction. For example, air exchange increases by surface heating and is larger when the leeward wall is heated. The distribution of CHTCs along the wall is also dependent on non-uniform wall heating intensity and orientation. This information is ultimately crucial in accurately predicting building energy demand and optimizing the placement of HVAC systems on exterior surfaces of buildings.

    Presented by Negin Nazarian: Studying Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at University of California, San Diego

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  1. Lifetime Achievement Award: Susan F. Tierney

    Managing Principal, Analysis Group

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    Sue Tierney is an expert on energy policy and economics, specializing in the electric and gas industries in the U.S. At Analysis Group in Boston, she has consulted to companies, governments, non-profit organizations, and others on energy markets, and economic and environmental regulation and strategy. She previously spent over a dozen years in state and federal government – as Assistant Secretary for Policy at the U.S. Department of Energy; and as cabinet officer for environmental affairs, public utility commissioner, and chair of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority in Massachusetts. She chairs the External Advisory Board of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, chairs the ClimateWorks Foundation Board, and is a director of World Resources Institute, the Alliance to Save Energy, and the Energy Foundation. She is a member of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s Energy Project, and the China Sustainable Energy Program’s Policy Advisory Council. She recently co-chaired the NAESB Gas-Electric Harmonization Committee, was a member of the National Academy of Sciences panel on shale gas risk, and was co-lead author of the energy chapter of the National Climate Assessment. She served on the U.S. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (and its Shale Gas Subcommittee). She has published widely, and frequently speaks at industry conferences and lectures at universities. She earned her Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in regional planning at Cornell University, New York (where her mentor was a female professor), and her B.A. at Scripps College (a women’s college in California). She and her husband, John Tierney, have two grown sons, James and Tom.
  2. Advocacy Leadership Award: Dorothy Barnett

    Executive Director, The Climate and Energy Project

    As Executive Director of the Climate + Energy Project, Dorothy Barnett is leading the effort to address the Heartland’s energy future. Grounded in an approach based on prosperity and energy security, Barnett has been successful in convening diverse voices in a conservative region of the country.

    Prior to her position as Executive Director, Barnett served for 4 years as CEP’s Director of Energy and Transmission. This work put Dorothy on the ground in energy policy work at the local, state and regional level. In this capacity she also led innovative programs such as the Take Charge Challenge and the Heartland Alliance for Regional Transmission – both of which raised the profile for energy efficiency, transmission and wind energy in Kansas and beyond. CEP’s newest project is gathering the agricultural, energy and water sectors to highlight innovative farm advancements in water and energy conservation that also positively impact the bottom-line. Barnett coordinated a successful and far-reaching effort to defend the Kansas Renewable Portfolio Standard from special interest groups attacks on clean energy during the 2014 Kansas legislative session.

    CEP and Mrs. Barnett have been recognized with national media attention, including MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show for the innovative work being done in Kansas and across the Heartland. Barnett is frequently invited to speak on a range of clean energy topics including a recent presentation at Yale for a public forum of “The ‘C’ Words: Addressing Climate Change Without Talking About Climate Change – a Regional Perspective.”

    Barnett got her start in wind energy with the Reno County Wind Energy Task Force, which was awarded the Governor’s Energy Award for Energy Education in 2008. Dorothy has a BA in organizational management from Friends University.

  3. Business Leadership Award: Zadhya Mohammed

    Head of Sales, Wind Service, Americas, Siemens

    Zadhya Mohammed has worked in the energy industry for 15 years and is leader in the business, as well as a mentor for Diversity at Siemens in the area of new employees, minorities, and women in the workplace.

    While completing her Masters in Mechanical Engineering, Zadhya started her career at Siemens as an intern, and was subsequently hired as a design engineer. She then worked in various teams that developed turbo-machinery for high efficient gas turbines, to reduce emissions, improve energy production, and improve the product cost for the ultimate sale to the customer. She then moved to a marketing role and was responsible for promoting and selling products and services to make the current North American customer fleet more efficient and affordable. During this time, Zadhya transitioned into management and also became involved in the Siemens Inclusion & Diversity Council, participating in a variety of formal and informal mentoring and leadership development initiatives, both internal and external to Siemens. These include participating in programs developed by the European School of Management & Technology and the nationwide Women UNLIMITED leadership development program. She is PMP and Six Sigma Green Belt certified.

    Zadhya is now in Siemens’ renewables division, as a senior marketing manager for the Americas. In this role, she is responsible for selling long term service contracts on wind turbines, as well as product upgrades to customers to improve energy output, as well as focusing on new markets in Central and South America. She continues to provide extensive mentoring to younger employees across various divisions of the corporation.

  4. Education Leadership Award: Debra Rowe

    Professor, Oakland Community College

    Dr. Rowe is the President of the U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development (www.uspartnership.org). The U.S. Partnership convenes members of the business, education, communities, government, and faith sectors of the U.S. and catalyzes national sustainability initiatives. Dr. Rowe is also co-founder of the Higher Education Associations Sustainability Consortium (www.aashe.org/heasc), founder/facilitator of the Disciplinary Associations’ Network for Sustainability (www.aashe.org/dans), Senior Fellow at Second Nature (www.secondnature.org) and Senior Advisor to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (www.aashe.org). She works with the private sector to catalyze successful business models for the triple bottom line of sustainability. She helps higher education faculty and staff, K-12 associations and other private and public institutions integrate sustainability into mission, curricula and training, research, policy, culture, purchasing and investments, facilities and operations, and community partnerships.

    Dr. Rowe has been staff consultant for a U.S. Department of Education funded project entitled “Sustainability Improves Student Learning” (http://serc.carleton.edu/sisl). Debra has also been professor of energy management and renewable energies for over 30 years at Oakland Community College (www.oaklandcc.edu/est). She has also developed curricula in sustainable development, products and processes and sustainable living. She also teaches Campus Sustainability and Corporate Sustainability for the University of Vermont. Dr. Rowe helps other colleges and universities create their energy management, renewable energies and sustainability programs.

    Dr Rowe is presently chairing the Technical Advisory Group and the Green Jobs Policy Community of Action for the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). In these roles, she convenes energy and sustainability experts, collects and reviews resources, and authors overarching documents for AACC’s Sustainability Education and Economic Development Resource Center (www.theSeedCenter.org). This Resource Center is designed to share curricula, partnership and civic engagement models, skills and competencies, quality criteria, promising practices and more resources relating to sustainability and green energy. Debra was also convener of the Detroit Green Skills Alliance, growing the green economy of Detroit while creating jobs for the Detroit area residents.
    Debra Rowe is often a keynote speaker at national and international education conferences. She is the author or editor of numerous publications, including the newly released encyclopedia, Achieving Sustainability: Vision, Principles and Practices.

  5. Entrepreneurial Leadership Award: Lisa Dyson

    Chief Technology Officer, Kiverdi, Inc.

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    Dr. Dyson is the CEO of Kiverdi, a next-generation sustainable oil company that converts CO2 and waste carbon gases into customized oils using the power of biotechnology. Dr. Dyson’s technical background began with a PhD in physics from MIT and has included research in bioengineering, energy and physics at Stanford University, UC Berkeley, Princeton University, UC San Francisco, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. Dr. Dyson was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of London, where she received a Master of Science degree, and has degrees in physics and mathematics from Brandeis University.

    Dr. Dyson has broad business experience developing corporate strategies in a number of industries including in packaging, energy, automotive, chemicals, telecommunications, travel, and non-profits. While at The Boston Consulting Group, Dr. Dyson worked with executives at multi-national corporations to help them solve strategic business problems including cutting operational costs, expanding internationally, franchising, developing governance structures, designing effective organizations and developing market entry strategies. Dr. Dyson’s entrepreneurial background began when she was on the founding team of an MIT start-up that received funding from Microsoft and later built and led a team that developed a technology that reached millions in volunteering campaigns.

    Among her recent accolades, Dr. Dyson was honored this year by the San Francisco Business Times as “One of the Most Influential Women in the Bay Area” for a second year in a row and was given their “Forty Under 40” award for her leadership.

  6. Government Leadership Award: Ghita Levenstein Carroll, Ph.D.

    Sustainability Coordinator, Boulder Valley School District

    Ghita Levenstein Carroll is the Sustainability Coordinator for the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD), located in Colorado. In this roll, Dr. Carroll is directing and coordinating existing efforts around sustainability, and garnering support and partnerships for further integrating sustainability into district operations and curriculum. Some of her successes include defining a vision and goals for district-wide environmental sustainability and receiving Board of Education approval for a policy that supports sustainability initiatives. She has significantly increased renewable energy technologies and green products throughout the district and implemented several energy, water and waste reduction strategies. Carroll emphasizes the educational opportunity in all of her projects, and has supported many new green teams throughout the school district. BVSD received the 2014 U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon Schools District Award for this work. Previously, Dr. Carroll managed the energy program for CU-Boulder’s Environmental Center. One of her major accomplishments in that role was to develop and lead a university wind power campaign in 2000, making CU-Boulder the first school in the nation to raise student fees to support wind power and the largest university purchaser of wind at the time. Ghita received a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder in 2008. Her dissertation work examined the relationship between emerging carbon markets and renewable energy markets. She has presented her work at forums such as the National Renewable Energy Marketing Conference, the First National Green Schools Conference, and conferences sponsored by the Electric Utility Industry and the American Wind Energy Association. Her work has been published in Energy Policy, Solar Today and by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Dr. Carroll is a LEED Green Associate and an Instructor for the Sustainable Practices Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She lives in Boulder with her husband and two children.
  7. International Leadership Award: Ashley Murray Muspratt

    Founder and CEO of Waste Enterprisers Ltd, Waste Enterprisers Holding and Pivot Kenya

    Ashley Muspratt is a waste-to-energy entrepreneur focused on using business to solve human waste management challenges in developing cities. She is the Founder & CEO of Waste Enterprisers Holding (USA)/Pivot Ltd (Kenya), a start-up company that converts human waste to solid fuel for industry. Ashley’s academic background includes a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley’s Energy & Resources Group and an M.S. from the university’s Civil and Environmental Engineering department. Her business background evolved over a childhood spent working at and helping manage her parents’ small businesses. Ashley is driven in her work by a passion for protecting the environment and a penchant for tackling global challenges.

    Ashley was named a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2011, was a Fellow at the 2012 Unreasonable Institute and mentor at the 2014 Unreasonable Institute East Africa, and has been an invited speaker at numerous conferences, including Harvard’s Africa Business Conference, World Water Week (Stockholm), and World Biofuels Market (Rotterdam). She has published over 10 peer-reviewed journal articles in the sanitation and renewable energy literature.

    Ashley lives in Mombasa, Kenya, where Pivot is constructing a waste-to-fuel factory. When she’s not in CEO mode, she enjoys the outdoors, a variety of sports, cooking, reading, traveling, and crossword puzzles. In addition to Kenya, she has lived and worked in China and Ghana; conducted short-term assignments in India, Uganda, and Senegal; and traveled extensively across Europe, Southeast Asia, and the U.S.

  8. Law & Finance Leadership Award: Phuong Young Phillips

    Assistant General Counsel, SolarCity Corporation

    Phuong Phillips is SolarCity Corporation’s Assistant General Counsel. SolarCity is the #1 solar installation company in the U.S. After working with SolarCity as its lead outside counsel, she joined the in-house team in 2011. Phuong leads the corporate and securities team and advises senior executives and the board of directors on a broad range of public company matters, including corporate governance, securities compliance, SEC reporting, internal and external communications and a variety of corporate transactions.

    As a key senior member of the SolarCity legal team, Phuong has helped drive the company’s rapid and enormous growth, particularly in managing such important transactions as the company’s IPO, convertible note financings, and first-of-their-kind solar asset securitization financings. She also recently has managed the development and anticipated deployment of an innovative financing platform for smaller investors to directly invest in clean energy projects, creating greater opportunities for clean energy investors and raising potentially up to hundreds of millions of dollars for the company to expand access to clean energy for customers. Phuong has played key roles in SolarCity’s acquisitions and integration of significant assets, technology and teams to support the company’s growth and to drive greater organizational and financial efficiencies.
    Previously, from 2003 to 2011, Phuong was an attorney at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, a premier national law firm focusing on technology companies. Phuong holds a B.A. in Communication Studies, with a specialization in Business Administration, and a J.D., both from the University of California, Los Angeles. Phuong also serves as chairwoman of the fundraising committee of her daughters’ public elementary school, as a board member of the local AYSO soccer league and as a manager of girls’ softball teams. Phuong lives with her husband and two young daughters in Los Altos, California.

  9. Research Leadership Award: Sila Kiliccote

    Leader, Grid Integration Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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    Sila Kiliccote is a Research Scientist, the Group Leader of the Grid Integration Group and the Deputy of the Demand Response Research Center at the Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her research interests include use of demand response and distributed energy resources for distribution system operation, including quantifying resource availability, advanced control of loads, communication systems and optimization of distribution networks. She is the recipient of the leadership award in Smart Grid Acceleration from GridWeek in 2010.

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